“Scene in LA” May 2019 by Steve Zall and Sid Fish

Here are some of the shows you can see in our local theaters this month:

“VIOLENCE: The Misadventures of Spike Spangle, Farmer” tells the story of Spike Spangle, a down on his luck farmer who gets sucked into a whirlwind of celebrity and patriotism. He joins Superman on billionaire Max Enormous’ Celebrity Space Shuttle and a nefarious plot leads to the deification of Spike Spangle as an American hero. Written by Tim Robbins and Adam Simon, and directed by Bob Turton, it runs May 2 through June 22 at the Ivy Substation in Culver City. For tickets call 310-838-4264 or visit www.TheActorsGang.com.

“Anna in the Tropics” It’s 1929, and flaring tensions between old traditions and new ways include the threat of new, mechanical cigar-rolling machines that loom over the factory workers who still roll cigars by hand. Also in danger is the tradition of the “Lectore de Tabaqueres,” who reads out loud to the cigar rollers to break the tedium and pass the time. The arrival of Juan Julian, the new lector, is cause for celebration. But when he reads Anna Karenina to the cigar rollers, he unwittingly becomes a catalyst in the lives of his avid listeners, for whom Tolstoy, the tropics and the American dream prove a volatile combination. Written by Nilo Cruz, and directed by Jon Lawrence Rivera, it runs May 3 through June 8 at the Atwater Village Theatre in Atwater Village. For tickets call 323-882-6912 or visit www.openfist.org.

“The Secret Garden” follows the story of Mary Lennox, a young British girl born and raised in colonial India. When the ten-year-old’s parents die in a cholera outbreak, she is sent to Yorkshire to live with a reclusive uncle and his invalid son. With the help of a host of ghosts, spirits, and lost souls Mary and Dickon, the young gardener uncover the mystery of the manor’s magical garden, discovering the power of hope and the magic needed to make love grow again. Filled with beautiful soaring ballads, this heartwarming story of forgiveness and renewal is the quintessential musical for all ages. Written by Frances Hodgson Burnett, with music by Marsha Norman and Lucy Simon, and directed by T.J. Dawson, it runs May 3 through May 19 at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts in Cerritos. For tickets call 562-916-8500 or visit www.3dtheatricals.org.

“And Then There Were None” Ten strangers are summoned to a remote island. All that the guests have in common is a wicked past they’re unwilling to reveal and a secret that will seal their fate. As the weather turns and the group is cut off from the mainland, the bloodbath begins and one by one they are brutally murdered in accordance with the lines of a sinister nursery rhyme. They all claim their innocence but yet they are all suspects. Who is the killer? Who will survive? The tension escalates as the survivors realize that the assassin is not only among them but is preparing to strike again. Written by Agatha Christie, and directed by Michael Thomas-Visgar, it runs May 4 through May 26 at the Morgan-Wixson Theatre in Santa Monica. For tickets call 310-828-7519 or visit www.morgan-wixson.org.

“Daniel’s Husband” Daniel Bixby and Mitchell Howard are a seemingly perfect couple. What isn’t so perfect is that Daniel desperately longs to be married, but Mitchell doesn’t believe in it. When an unexpected turn of events puts their perfect life in jeopardy, they are thrust into a future where love may not be enough. Written by Michael McKeever, and directed by Simon Levy, it runs May 4 through June 23 at the Fountain Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-663-1525 or visit www.FountainTheatre.com.

“Julius Weezer” Shakespeare’s story of Caesar, with the funk-rock riffs of the resurgent and ubiquitous band, Weezer. This 90 minute hard-driving, heart pounding, adrenaline rush of a show will feature the Troubies in all their classical glory – speaking the speech and strumming the power chords. The production will take advantage of the El Portal’s wonderfully theatricalized confines to create a bloody, bold and resolute retelling of one of Shakespeare’s great tragedies. Age appropriate for eight and up, the show will feature special make-up effects that may disturb some younger guests – after all, Caesar was stabbed 33 times. Part circus, part improv comedy show, part rock concert – with a live band that complements and compels the Troubie cast as they wind their way through the dark and dangerous world of Julius Weezer. Enjoy the madness with the Troubies and be able to say: “I came, I saw, I conquered…and I rocked out!”. Written and directed by Matt Walker, it runs May 4 through May 19 at the El Portal Theatre in North Hollywood. For tickets call 866-811-4111 or visit www.elportaltheatre.com.

“The Long Gravel Road” a new theatre piece that invokes the French actor/director theorist Artaud’s famous radical manifesto on ‘metaphysical Mise en Scene’, which suggests a departure from an exclusively rational text and dovetails into space where movement and sounds are more predominant. A modern re-telling of the Parsifal myth, the story revolves around a man’s primordial recognition of himself seduced in a cosmic overture and by the idea of Individuation, Carl Jung’s term for the life long journey in which a person becomes the complete entity God intended. Written and directed by Abbott Alexander, with music by Garrett Parks, it runs May 4 through June 1 at the Theatre West in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-851-7977 or visit www.theatrewest.org/the-long-gravel-road.

“Hershey Felder, A Paris Love Story” Virtuoso actor and pianist Hershey Felder takes us on his own personal journey as he explores the life and music of Impressionist composer Claude Debussy. For decades Felder’s “Great Composer Series” has celebrated the brilliance of Beethoven, Berlin, Tchaikovsky, and more. In this glorious new production, he brings to life a visionary who proclaimed nature his religion, creating music of ravishing beauty, color and compassion. From the sweeping “La Mer” to the evocative “Prélude à L’après-midi d’un Faune” and the mystical “Clair de Lune”, this soaring tribute will never be forgotten. Written by Hershey Felder, with music by Claude Debussy, and directed by Trevor Hay, it runs May 8 through May 19 at the Laguna Playhouse in Laguna Beach, then May 24 through June 9 at the Wallis Annenberg Center for Performing Arts in Beverly Hills. For tickets in Laguna Beach call 949-497-2787 or visit www.lagunaplayhouse.com. For tickets in Beverly Hills call 310-746-4000 or visit www.TheWallis.org/Debussy.

“Mamma Mia!” On the eve of her wedding, a daughter’s quest to discover the identity of her father brings three men from her mother’s past back to the Greek island they last visited 20 years ago. The storytelling magic of ABBA’s timeless hits sets the scene for this infectious tale of love and frolicking fun, creating an unforgettable musical experience that will leave you dancing in the aisles! Written by Catherine Johnson, with music by Benny Andersson & Björn Ulvaeus, and directed by Snehal Desai, it runs May 9 through June 9 at the David Henry Hwang Theater in Los Angeles. For tickets call 213-625-7000 or visit www.eastwestplayers.org.

“12 Angry Men – By 12 Impassioned Women” In the story, a19-year-old man has just stood trial for the fatal stabbing of his father. It looks like an open-and-shut case until one of the jurors begins opening the others’ eyes to the facts. Sequestered in a small room, each juror reveals their own character as the various testimonies are re-examined, the murder is re-enacted and a new murder threat is born before their eyes. Written by Reginald Rose, adapted by Sherman L. Sergel, and directed by Natalia Lazarus, it runs May 10 through June 15 at the Promenade Playhouse in Santa Monica. For tickets call 310-656-8070 or visit www.promenadeplayhouse.com.

“The Christians” When the pastor of a mega church unilaterally decides to enlighten his congregation with his own personal revelation, he is faced with doubt and dissension among his flock. Written by Lucas Hnath, and directed by Thomas James O’Leary, it runs May 10 through June 16 at the Actors Co-op Crossley Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-462-8460 or visit www.ActorsCo-op.org.

“The Price” In this powerful and provocative play about the true cost of living, two estranged brothers must try to make peace with their past when they meet to dispose of their late father’s belongings. Written by Arthur Miller, and directed by John Henry Davis, it runs May 10 through May 26 at the Long Beach Performing Arts Center in Long Beach. For tickets call 562-436-4610 or visit www.InternationalCityTheatre.org.

“M. Butterfly” starts in 1986, with René Gallimard in prison, where he’s serving a sentence for treason. Through a series of flashbacks, his tale unfolds beginning with his time as a member of the French embassy in China during the Cultural Revolution when he fell in love with Song Liling, a Chinese opera star. A longtime fan of Puccini’s opera, Madame Butterfly, Gallimard considers Song to be the perfect woman. But Song is not who she claims to be. Written by David Henry Hwang, and directed by Desdemona Chiang, it runs May 11 through June 8 at the South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. For tickets call 714-708-5555 or visit www.scr.org.

“Samsara” Katie and Craig are having a baby—via a surrogate—who lives in India. A month before the baby’s due date, Craig reluctantly travels to the subcontinent where he meets Suraiya, their young, less-than-thrilled surrogate. As all three parents anxiously await the baby’s birth, flights of fancy attack them from all sides. Written by Lauren Yee, and directed by Rebecca Wear, it runs May 11 through June 1 at the Met Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-944-2165 or visit www.coeurage.org/buytickets.

“Shame of Thrones: The Musical” Just in time for Game of Thrones’ final season, spoof musical Shame of Thrones: The Musical returns to L.A. for more hilarious re-imagining of the show’s backstabbing siblings, clever imps and dragon mamas, all set to an addictive rock score that’ll stick in your head (unless the king orders it off, natch). Watch your favorite daring and most despised characters sing and dance towards epic plot twists and the coveted Iron Throne. Written by Steven Brandon and Steven Christopher Parker, and directed by Rachel Stein, it runs May 13 through July 8 at the Whitefire Theatre in Sherman Oaks. For tickets visit www.brownpapertickets.com/event/4188534.

“Invisible Tango” Storyteller and master illusionist Helder Guimarães­ returns to the Geffen Playhouse to share his personal perspective on how we can experience mystery in today’s world. In the midst of the information age and our culture of over-sharing, Guimarães challenges our interaction with the unknown and explores how we can embrace chaos, fear and wonder. Mind-blowing illusions, impossible coincidences, and entirely new perspectives will leave audiences wondering, just how did he do it? Written by Helder Guimarães, with music by Moby, and directed by Frank Marshall, it runs May 15 through June 30 at the Audrey Skirball Kenis Theater at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-208-5454 or visit www.geffenplayhouse.org.

“Lady Day at Emerson’s Bar and Grill” The time is 1959, a seedy bar in Philadelphia. The audience is about to witness one of Billie Holiday’s last performances, given four months before her death. More than a dozen musical numbers – including “What a Moonlight Can Do,” “Crazy He Calls Me,” “Easy Living,” “Strange Fruit,” “Taint Nobody’s Biz-ness If I Do,” and “God Bless the Child” — are interlaced with salty, often humorous, reminiscences to project a riveting portrait of the lady and her music. FOR THIS PRODUCTION there will be LIMITED ON-STAGE VIP SEATING. This immersive experience will put you right in the middle of the action! On-stage seating includes a complimentary bottle of wine or champagne, served right at your table for two! Must be 21+ to access ON STAGE seating. Written by Lanie Robertson, and directed by Gregg T. Daniel, it runs May 15 through June 2 at the Garry Marshall Theatre in Burbank. For tickets call 818-955-8101 or visit www.garrymarshalltheatre.org.

“A Bad Year for Tomatoes” Fed up with the pressures and demands of her acting career, the famous Myra Marlowe leases a house in the tiny Vermont hamlet of Beaver Haven, and settles down to write her autobiography. She is successful in turning aside the offers pressed on her by her long-time agent, but dealing with her nosy, omnipresent neighbors is a different matter. In an attempt to shoo them away, and gain some privacy, Myra invents a mad, homicidal sister – who is kept locked in an upstairs room, but who occasionally escapes long enough to scare off uninvited visitors. The ruse works well, at first, but complications result when the local handyman conceives an affection for “Sister Sadie” (really Myra in a fright wig) and some of the more officious ladies decide it is their Christian duty to save the poor demented Sadie’s soul. In desperation, Myra announces that her imaginary sibling has suddenly gone off to Boston – which brings on the sheriff, and the suspicion of murder! Written by John Patrick, and directed by Larry Eisenberg, it runs May 16 through June 16 at the Theatre 40, in the Reuben Cordova Theatre in Beverly Hills. For tickets call 310-364-0535 or visit www.theatre40.org.

“At the Table” Six friends head out of the city on their annual weekend retreat. With no social media, no cell phones, no internet allowed at all, this leaves them with one thing to do… look up from their screens and talk to each other. When the liquor starts flowing and the tongues loosen, no conversation is uneventful and no topic is off-limits. In these polarizing times, what does it mean to come to the table and at what cost? Will it bring us together or reveal how far apart we really are? Written by Michael Perlman, and directed by Judith Moreland, it runs May 17 through July 7 at the Road Theatre on Lankershim in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-761-8838 or visit www.roadtheatre.org.

“Nunsense” a hilarious musical comedy begins when the little sisters of Hoboken discover that their cook, Sister Julia, has poisoned 52 of the sisters. It was an accident, of course, but now they are in dire need of funds for the funerals. The surviving sisters put their heads together and have decided to use their long lost talents to put on a variety show! Have you ever seen a former circus performer turned Nun come out of retirement to put on a show? Amidst tap dancing, circus tricks and the rest of the convents whimsical talents, join us to see what this little sister of Hoboken (what’s left of them) stir up to help raise money to bury their dearly departed. Written by Dan Goggin, with music by Dan Goggin, and directed by George Strattan, it runs May 17 through June 22 at the Glendale Centre Theatre in Glendale. For tickets call 818-244-8481 Ext. 2 or visit www.glendalecentretheatre.com.

“Pippin” tells the story of a young prince who longs to find passion and adventure in his life. This beautiful and thought-provoking musical uses the premise of a magical and mysterious performance troupe, led by a Leading Player, to lead the audience through Pippins adventures. Written by Roger O. Hirson, with music by Stephen Schwartz, and directed by Alison Boole, it runs May 17 through June 22 at the Westchester Playhouse in Westchester. For tickets call 310-645-5156 or visit www.kentwoodplayers.org.

“Bronco Billy – The Musical” the country’s going crazy; partisan politics, civil rights threatened, technology exploding. That’s right, it’s 1979! Somewhere in America’s heartland, with more heart than sense, Bronco Billy struggles to keep his traveling wild west show alive. But when Billy and his ragtag troupe of misfits meet Antoinette, a Manhattan heiress on-the-run, the ride gets even wilder as she turns Billy’s world upside down. Written by Dennis Hackin, with music by Chip Rosenbloom & John Torres, additional lyrics by Michele Brourman, and directed by Hunter Bird, it runs May 18 through June 30 at the Skylight Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 213-761-7061 or visit www.SkylightTix.com.

“Noises Off” is a joyfully out-of-control British farce featuring an under-rehearsed and over-worked cast and crew with a penchant for drama more personal than professional, readying themselves for the world premiere of a new play with the auspicious title, Nothing On. As the production progresses, the bumbling cast brings down the house – literally! Written by Michael Frayn, and directed by Julia Rodriguez-Elliott and Geoff Elliott, it runs May 21 through June 9 at the A Noise Within in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-356-3121 or visit www.anoisewithin.org.

“Mama Metal” entwines issues of identity with pop culture icons to tell a truly unique mother-daughter story. Sterling Milburn’s mother is dying and Sterling is falling apart. She attempts to keep it together by rewriting the past with the help of two titans of the American theater and the world’s greatest heavy metal band — but Sterling’s mother refuses to follow the script. A love letter to those who shape our lives, hold us together and break our hearts. Written by Sigrid Gilmer, and directed by Deena Selenow, it runs May 23 through June 23 at the Atwater Village Theatre in Atwater Village. For tickets call 323-380-8843 or visit www.iamatheatre.com.

“Be a Good Little Widow” Young newlywed Melody has never been to a funeral – until her husband dies in a plane crash. Expected to instantly assume proper widowhood, Melody is left to wonder, what’s the right way to grieve? Fortunately, her mother-in-law is a professional. Widow, that is. Under her guidance, Melody must try her best to be a good little widow. An emotional comedy about loss and longing. Written by Bekah Brunstetter, and directed by Brandon Baer, it runs May 24 through June 9 at the Odyssey Theatre in West Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-477-2055 Ext. 2 or visit www.web.ovationtix.com/trs/pr/1010034.

“Gather: Surprising Stories & Other Mischief” audiences will be transported to wondrous worlds full of legendary creatures and colorful characters in a magical experience for young and old. Traditional folklore including such well-known tales as The Bremen Town Musicians as well as contemporary pieces such as War Game will spring to life side by side. Written by John C. Reilly and Patrick Murphy, and directed by Patrick Murphy, it runs May 24 through June 22 at the Pasadena Playhouse in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-356-7529 or visit www.PasadenaPlayhouse.org.

“Ladies” is a fictional account of the real women behind The Blue Stocking Society, the world’s first major feminist movement in 1750’s London, told through a modern lens. The ladies’ ambitious goals soon create scandal in London society and conflicts amongst themselves, escalating into a tangled knot of electric and jagged relationships. These women are emboldened by their righteous cause and burdened by being revolutionaries far ahead of their time. This deliciously funny and irreverent world premiere examines the humanity and passion of these trailblazing ladies, and inspires us to carry on the work they began. Written by Kit Steinkellner, and directed by Jessica Kubzansky, it runs May 24 through June 30 at the Boston Court Pasadena in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-683-6801 or visit www.BostonCourtPasadena.org.

“A Streetcar Named Desire” In the sultry streets of New Orleans, passions flare and cultures collide in this masterpiece. Blanche DuBois, a fading relic of the Old South, searches for refuge at her sister’s home, only to collide with reality in the form of Stanley Kowalski, her sexy and brutal brother-in-law. Written by Tennessee Williams, and directed by Jack Heller, it runs May 25 through July 7 at the Odyssey Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-477-2055 Ext. 2 or visit www.OdysseyTheatre.com.

“Herland” tells the story of Natalie, a recent high school graduate who gets a summer internship working for her elderly neighbor Jean. She is tasked with the special project of creating a DIY retirement home for Jean and her two best friends Louise and Terry. As Natalie helps set up shop in Jean’s garage – formerly a rehearsal space for her ex-husband’s Springsteen cover band – she finds herself planning the next chapter of the trio’s lives together. This is a queer coming-of-age comedy about women growing up, growing old, and growing into themselves. Written by Grace McLeod, and directed by Tiffany Moon, it runs May 30 through June 23 at the Greenway Court Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-673-0544 or visit www.GreenwayCourtTheatre.org.

“Avenue Q” This fresh and unusual Tony-award winning musical is a coming-of-age parable, addressing and satirizing the anxieties associated with entering adulthood. Its characters lament that as children, they were assured by their parents, and by Sesame Street, that they were “extraordinary” and “could do anything”; but as adults, they have discovered,  to their surprise,  that in the real world their options are limited, and they are actually ordinary like everyone else. This quirky musical ranks 24th on the list of the longest running shows in Broadway history. Avenue Q is notable for the use of puppets, animated by unconcealed puppeteers. Written by Jeff Whitty, based on an original concept by Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx, with music by Robert Lopez and Jeff Marx, and directed by Patrick Burke, it runs May 31 through July 7 at the Lonny Chapman Theatre in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-763-5990 or visit www.thegrouprep.com.

“Cinderella Topsy Turvey” It’s the internationally acclaimed Rudie-DeCarlo musical comedy, and it’s getting a make-over as Actors’ Repertory Theatre in-conjunction with All the Queen’s Men presents this Tender Gender Bender Romantic Musical Fairy Story for Pride 2019. A delightful re-imagining of the classic Cinderella tale brings you upside-down casting – half original practices, half Gilbert and Sullivan, half just plain fun. Meet a handsome Prince, silly stepsisters, a befuddled king, and an out-of-the-box steampunk Fairy godmother. Added delights are the outrageously playful period costumes and the heart-warming romance that blooms with the assistance of a glass slipper, a feather duster, and a truly magical wand. A gentle prod at stereotypical gender roles, this light-hearted send-up is a hilarious twist on the classic tale. Written and directed by Chris DeCarlo & Evelyn Rudie, with music by Evelyn Rudie, it runs May 31 through June 22 at the Santa Monica Playhouse in Santa Monica. For tickets call 310-394-9779 Ext. 2 or visit www.santamonicaplayhouse.com/cinderella-pride-2019.html.

“Lend Me a Tenor” It’s Cleveland, 1934. The local opera company is set to present Verdi’s Otello, starring the world-famous Italian tenor, Tito. After a huge fight with his very jealous wife, Tito receives a double dose of tranquilizers.  Can he go on as planned? An angry wife, a presumed death, crazy costumes, secret sex romps and loads of slamming doors and mistaken identities make for a delightful, farcical comedy! Written by Ken Ludwig, and directed by Sherman Wayne, it runs May 31 through July 7 at the Theatre Palisades Pierson Playhouse in Pacific Palisades. For tickets call 310-454-1970 or visit www.theatrepalisades.org.

Enjoy life more – see a show tonight!

“Scene in LA” April 2019 by Steve Zall and Sid Fish

Here are some of the shows you can see in our local theaters this month:

“The Root Beer Bandits – A Rootin’ Tootin’ Wild West Musicale” tells the story of Polly Peppercorn, the only female to ride for the Pony Express. But as often is the case — that is her predicament – she really has dreams to become a songwriter. When Polly delivers a letter to Sheriff Bailey of Sarsaparilla City, they discover that Copper Penny is scheming to steal the city’s famous root beer supply. With Sally Sue Tucker, a trailblazing female entrepreneur named helping her, and Sheriff Bailey, Polly sets things right and makes it clear that everyone is capable of greatness, no matter what their circumstances may be. Written by Joseph Leo Bwarie and Lori Marshall, with music by Rachael Lawrence, it runs April 4 through April 28 at the Garry Marshall Theatre in Burbank. For tickets call 818-955-8101 or visit www.garrymarshalltheatre.org.

“Clybourne Park” explodes into two outrageous acts set fifty years apart. Act One takes place in 1959, as nervous community leaders anxiously try to stop the sale of a home to a black family. Act Two is set in the same house in the present day, as the now predominantly African-American neighborhood battles to holds its ground in the face of gentrification. Written by Bruce Norris, and directed by Tory Torissi, it runs April 5 through May 5 at the Theatre Palisades Pierson Playhouse in Pacific Palisades. For tickets call 310-454-1970 or visit www.theatrepalisades.org.

“Doris and Me” is Scott Dreier’s loving tribute to Day, who will have her 97th birthday during the week that this engagement opens. Dreier, himself a gifted vocalist, sings her hits with piano and bass accompaniment: Secret Love, Que Sera Sera, It’s Magic, Everybody Loves a Lover, Sentimental Journey, and many more. He seamlessly weaves behind-the-scenes stories and over 75 curated images and clips from the iconic superstar’s film and recording career with her beloved song hits. Written by Scott Dreier and Kurtis Simmons, and directed by Richard Israel, it runs April 5 through April 14 at the Sierra Madre Playhouse in Sierra Madre. For tickets call 626-355-4318 or visit www.sierramadreplayhouse.org.

“My Life on a Diet” looks back on a life full of memorable roles in Hollywood and on Broadway… and just as many fad diets. A self-described “diet junkie” who believed that if she ate like a star, she just might look and live like one, Taylor dishes out juicy anecdotes about — and weight loss tips from — such Hollywood legends as Joan Crawford, Marilyn Monroe and Barbra Streisand. She also serves up entertaining and poignant stories about the late Bologna, her partner in work and life for 52 years. Considered a comedy legend, she tells about her high and lows – on and off the scale – and shows audiences that the ability to laugh gets you through it all. Written by Renée Taylor and Joseph Bologna, and directed by Joseph Bologna, it runs April 5 through April 14 at the Wallis Annenberg Center for Performing Arts in Beverly Hills. For tickets call 310-746-4000 or visit www.TheWallis.org/Diet.

“Working 2020” explores what work means to different people in different circumstances in the U.S. today, adding new characters, and this time focusing on the sadly relevant slide from middle to working class. Written by Bobby Moresco, it runs April 5 through May 10 at the Whitefire Theatre in Sherman Oaks. For tickets call 818-687-8559 or visit www.whitefiretheatre.com.

“All My Sons” this electrifying family drama remains as timely as it is timeless. A gripping American classic reveals the lethal consequences of deceit and greed. In the aftermath of WWII, Joe Keller and his family struggle to stay intact while planning for their future as a long-hidden secret begins to tear them apart—forcing a reckoning with truth, guilt, and repentance. Written by Arthur Miller, and directed by Gary Lee Reed, it runs April 6 through May 12 at the Lounge Theatre 1 in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-960-5570 or visit www.onstage411.com/sons.

“Birdland Blue” At Broadway and 52nd Street in New York City, the nightclub Birdland was the legendary center of the jazz world, where the glitterati of Broadway, Hollywood and the sports world regularly filled its 500 seats. In August, 1959, the biggest star in jazz was Miles Davis, who earlier that year recorded Kind of Blue, regarded then and now as the most innovative and best jazz album of all time. The Miles Davis Sextet, as constituted that summer, was regarded as the best jazz combo ever. This is a behind-the-scenes look at Miles on one evening that August. He flirts with a beautiful reporter for a jazz magazine. He copes with division within his ranks, as two of his musicians (Julius “Cannonball” Adderley and John Coltrane) are on the verge of leaving the Sextet to start their own groups. He deals with substance abuse problems, his own and that of one of his musicians. He argues with the club owner/manager over proper compensation. His biggest challenge may be coming from a violent, crooked, racist cop. Written by Randy Ross PhD, and directed by Ben Guillory, it runs April 6 through May 12 at the Los Angeles Theatre Center in Los Angeles. For tickets call 866-811-4111 or visit www.thelatc.org.

“The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane” In this powerful and highly stylized story, Edward Tulane is a porcelain rabbit who must learn the meaning of love: what it is to love, what it is to lose that love and how to find the courage to love again. Written by Kate DiCamillo, adapted by Dwayne Hartford, with music by Bradley Brough, and directed by Debbie Devine, it runs April 6 through May 19 at the 24th Street Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 213-745-6516 or visit www.24thstreet.org.

“Poor Yella Rednecks” picks up the story six years later as his mom and dad (Tong and Quang) try to build a new life in a foreign land called Arkansas. They find that marriage is hard, especially when she’s having doubts and his first one isn’t over yet. Written by Qui Nguyen, and directed by May Adrales, it runs April 6 through April 27 at the South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. For tickets call 714-708-5555 or visit www.scr.org.

“The Things We Do” Bill falls for Sarah, but she is married to Ted. Ted might be a good match for Alice — who is married to Bill. Once trust is broken, how do you get it back? Written by Grant Woods, and directed by Elina de Santos, it runs April 6 through May 12 at the Odyssey Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-477-2055 Ext. 2 or visit www.OdysseyTheatre.com.

“Mistakes Were Made – Coulda-Woulda-Shoulda” Dick’s mistake: He let a sexy, blue-eyed winker threaten his marriage. Jeff’s mistake: He turned down a dream job, then later, screamed, “You idiot!” Mel’s mistake: He hired a famous money manager, now famous for stealing money. Dick’s wife’s mistake: She trusted him, then learned of his affair and had one too. NOBODY’S PERFECT! But mistakes can be fixed, between husbands and wives, girlfriends and boyfriends, fathers and sons. Written by Jerry Mayer, and directed by Chris DeCarlo, it runs April 7 through June 30 at the Santa Monica Playhouse in Santa Monica. For tickets call 310-394-9779 Ext. 1 or visit www.SantaMonicaPlayhouse.com/mistakes.

“Tiny Beautiful Things” is about Sugar, an anonymous online advice columnist to whom thousands of people have turned for words of wisdom, honesty and hope. At first unsure of herself, Sugar finds a way to weave her own life experiences together with the deep yearning and real problems of her readers, creating a beloved column about the monstrous beauty, endless dark and glimmering light at the heart of being human. Written by Cheryl Strayed, adapted by Nia Vardalos, and directed by Sherri Eden Barber, it runs April 10 through May 5 at the Pasadena Playhouse in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-356-7529 or visit www.PasadenaPlayhouse.org.

“The Chekhov Comedies” includes five lesser-known short works. They will be performed by an all-female cast of four woman who will portray twenty-five characters. The storylines:

On the anniversary of a successful banking institution, its director suddenly finds himself in what may appear to be a compromising position.

A marriage proposal may be suddenly derailed by a dispute over a small parcel of land.

At a wedding, the bride’s parents have paid for a general to be a V.I.P. speaker at the festivities. Will they be the targets of a swindle?

A fellow collapses on a friend’s couch, seeking respite from the many favors being asked by others…guess what happens next?

A hardened man suddenly finds himself falling hard for the widow who owes him money. Written by Anton Chekhov, and directed by Rebecca Lynne, it runs April 11 through April 27 at the Brand Park in Glendale. For tickets visit www.deanproductionstheatre.com.

“Duet for One” A famous concert violinist is stricken with a disease which necessitates her retirement from the stage and which threatens her marriage as well. The play is structured as a series of interviews between the violinist and her psychiatrist in which she tries to cope with her illness and its effect on her life. Written by Tom Kempinski, and directed by Allen Barton, it runs April 12 through May 12 at the Beverly Hills Playhouse in Beverly Hills. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.duetforonebhp.brownpapertickets.com.

“The Lost Virginity Tour” is a comedy about four women recalling their first time, mining the importance of female issues, and the progress made in the past few decades. Funny, profound, and provocative, this adventurous road trip through memories conjures up the choices we make that shape our lives forever – and the friendships that hold us up when we can’t walk on our own. Written by Cricket Daniel, and directed by Kristin Towers-Rowles, it runs April 13 through May 5 at the McCadden Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.brownpapertickets.com/event/4191014.

“Sheepdog” Two police officers in Cleveland—they’re partners and they’re in a relationship. She is African American; he is white and things have been good. But what happens if an incident in the line of duty changes the foundation of who they are together? It’s a mystery within a love story about Amina and Ryan, and what happens to rock their relationship to its core. Amina has been on the police force for 13 years, and Ryan for 8; and she’ll follow her training to get to the truth in the case that unfolds. And to do that—to solve it—she has to explore her past and those memories serve as clues to the present. Written by Kevin Artigue, and directed by Leah C. Gardiner, it runs April 14 through May 5 at the South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. For tickets call 714-708-5555 or visit www.scr.org.

“The Niceties” At an elite East Coast university, an ambitious young black student and her esteemed white professor meet to discuss a paper the college junior is writing about the American Revolution. They’re both liberal. They’re both women. They’re both brilliant. But very quickly, discussions of grammar and Google turn to race and reputation, and before they know it, they’re in dangerous territory neither of them had foreseen — and facing stunning implications that can’t be undone. Written by Eleanor Burgess, and directed by Kimberly Senior, it runs April 17 through May 12 at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-208-5454 or visit www.geffenplayhouse.org.

“Tapestry, The Carole King Songbook” Suzanne O. Davis gives an energetic and heartfelt performance along with the band and takes you on a journey into those great recordings. This show not only performs songs from the record-breaking, Grammy winning album of the same name, but also Carole’s follow-up hits that continued throughout the 70’s. Impeccable attention to detail is taken in recreating a respectful and accurate musical presentation of Carole’s piano vocals, just as they were. Written by Carole King, with music by Carole King, it runs April 17 through April 21 at the Laguna Playhouse in Laguna Beach. For tickets call 949-497-2787 or visit www.lagunaplayhouse.com.

“Diana of Dobson’s” When poorly paid worker Diana inherits enough money to free her from a lifetime of drudgery, she impulsively decides to spend it all on a madcap, month-long taste of the high-life. But what she learns about love, money and society is as timely in 2019 as it was at the turn of the 20th century. Antaeus Theatre Company presents a fully partner-cast production, presenting two equally excellent but very different sets of actors at alternating performances. Written by Cicely Hamilton, and directed by Casey Stangl, it runs April 18 through June 3 at the Kiki & David Gindler Performing Arts Center in Glendale. For tickets call 818-506-1983 or visit www.Antaeus.org.

“Sand Moon” What does it mean to love someone? What do we do when that person becomes unrecognizable? When a brother and sister start bringing their girlfriends on family vacations, a house built on secrets begins to shift. The push and pull of the ones we love gives us one of two options: resist or relent? Written and directed by Liz Lanier, it runs April 19 through April 28 at the Son of Semele Theater in Los Angeles. For tickets call 213-351-3507 or visit www.artful.ly/son-of-semele-ensemble.

“Sister Act, the Musical” tells the story of Deloris Van Cartier, a disco nightclub diva, who witnesses a murder committed by her mobster boyfriend, Curtis Jackson, after which Deloris is placed in a witness protective program in a convent under the custody of the local police department. Comedy ensues as Deloris dons a nun’s habit to go undercover as “Sister Mary Clarence,” while attempting to acclimate herself into her new lifestyle in a convent. Written by Cheri and Bill Steinkellner, with additional book material by Douglas Carter Beane, with music by Alan Menken, with lyrics by Glenn Slater, and directed by Rigo Tejeda, it runs April 19 through May 19 at the CASA 0101 Theater in Boyle Heights. For tickets call 323-263-7684 or visit www.casa0101.org.

“Macbeth” This new take on the classic story of the rise of the King of Scotland examines the sacrifices and consequences women face in their quest for power and recognition, as inspired by the Norse tradition against the backdrop of the Viking invasion. Written by William Shakespeare, and directed by Bree Pavey and Emma Latimer, it runs April 20 through May 27 at the Loft Ensemble in Sherman Oaks. For tickets call 818-616-3150 or visit www.loftensemble.org.

“Revolutions/Revoluciones” A highly theatrical fever-dream that employs magical realism to tell the kaleidoscope journey of a strong and passionate woman facing an impossible tragedy. A desperate mother searches for her disappeared son amidst a totalitarian regime in an unnamed Latin American country. Presented in Spanish with English supertitles. Written by Elaine Romero, and directed by Bruno Bichir, it runs April 20 through May 12 at the Los Angeles Theatre Center in Los Angeles. For tickets call 866-811-4111 or visit www.thelatc.org.

 

“Singin’ in the Rain” The Greatest Movie Musical of All Time has been faithfully adapted from the original award-winning screenplay. Each unforgettable scene, song and dance is accounted for, including the show- stopping title number, complete with an onstage rainstorm! Knock-‘em-dead dance routines, hilarious situations, snappy dialogue, and a hit-parade score of Hollywood standards make this the perfect entertainment for any fan of the Golden Age of movie musicals! Written by Betty Comden & Adolph Green, with music by Nacio Herb Brown and Arthur Freed, and directed by Spencer Liff, it runs April 20 through May 12 at the La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts in La Mirada. For tickets call 562-944-9801 or visit www.lamiradatheatre.com.

“Old Jews Telling Jokes” which has been called a “pickle-barrel full of giggles,” showcases five actors in a revue-type production that pays tribute to and reinvents classic jokes of the past and present. It celebrates the rich tradition of Jewish humor and ‘all the rabbis, complaining wives, fed-up husbands, patience-challenged physicians, gossiping ladies, and competitive men’ populating it. The humor is suggestive and even raunchy as the ‘Old Jews’ make fun of themselves as well as followers of every other religion. Written by Peter Gethers and Daniel Okrent, and directed by Jeremy Quinn, it runs April 25 through June 16 at the Colony Theatre in Burbank. For tickets call 855-448-7469 or visit www.playhouseinfo.com.

“Boxing Lessons” When a famous writer dies under mysterious circumstances, family and friends gather in his cabin on a remote island in the Puget Sound to box up his belongings. As they go through the clutter dad left behind, hidden family secrets come to light — and they come to realize just how much they both despise and love one another. Written by John Bunzel, and directed by Jack Stehlin, it runs April 26 through June 2 at the New American Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets call 310-424-2980 or visit www.newamericantheatre.com.

“Brain Problems” After being diagnosed with ‘brain problems,’ a cynical man copes with his life-threatening condition by retreating into his imagination. Written by Malcolm Barrett, and directed by Bernardo Cubria, it runs April 26 through May 19 at the Pico in West Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-798-5389 or visit www.ammotheatre.com.

“Dr. Nympho vs. The Sex Zombies” Every family has issues. No issues run deeper than those of the brilliant pathologist and matriarch Dr. Nimfa Delacroix. She was a nymphomaniac in the past but now lives a “normal life” with her nuclear 21st century family. All of her demons must be confronted however, when the outbreak of a deadly STD launches in Atlanta, turning its residents into zombies that promises the end of civilization. Can Nimfa unite her family? Can she overcome her past? Can she save the world? For Mature Audiences 18 and older. Written by Michael Shaw Fisher, with music by Michael Shaw Fisher, and directed by Sarah Haworth-Hodges, it runs April 26 through May 26 at the Celebration Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-957-1884 or visit www.celebrationtheatre.com.

“The End of Sex” It’s Nancy’s birthday. Her daughter and son-in-law come to take the parents out to celebrate. But when new desires and old frustrations collide over dinner, all four slide into a tense standoff as Nancy questions her own collusion with the sexual agreements and power dynamics within her own marriage. Written by Gay Walch, and directed by Maria Gobetti, it runs April 26 through June 2 at the Victory Theatre Center in Burbank. For tickets call 818-841-5421 or visit www.thevictorytheatrecenter.org.

“A Small Group” an aspiring young comedian wakes up in rehab and can’t remember how he got there. He doesn’t believe he belongs there; does he, or doesn’t he? Tormented by the ticking clock, the chugging water cooler, and the buzzing flies, sometimes life isn’t a comedy bit. Written by Taylor Gregory, and directed by Jacob Ortuño, it runs April 26 through May 18 at the Hudson Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-960-7773 or visit www.onstage411.com/asmallgroup.

“Swing!” tells the story of Adrianna, a factory worker in the 40’s who is holding down her husband Butch’s factory job while he’s at war. Once he returns home, both Adrianna and Butch feel like they don’t fit into their old lives. When she meets Janine, Adrianna rediscovers old passions that she put away when she was first married. While her feelings blossom for Janine, Adrianna ‘s love for her husband is also rekindled. Adrianna’s difficult choice in a time of forbidden love fuels this passionate musical journey. Written by Michael Antin, with music by Michael Antin, and directed by Corey Lynn Howe, it runs April 27 through May 19 at the Write Act Repertory (at The Brickhouse Theatre) in North Hollywood. For tickets visit www.brownpapertickets.com/event/4225661.

“Crime and Punishment” is a thrilling 90-minute psychological inquiry into the troubled mind of a murderer. Dive into the greatest crime story ever written, a tale of murder, motive and redemption that plumbs the depths of the human soul. Written by Fyodor Dostoevsky, adapted by Marilyn Campbell and Curt Columbus, and directed by Peter Richards, it runs April 27 through May 26 at the Edgemar Center for the Arts in Santa Monica. For tickets call 323-960-7822 or visit www.OnStage411.com/Crime.

“Women Beyond Borders” a play inspired by and loosely based on the remarkable journey of Lorraine Serena and a dynamic group of California-based artists who founded the non-profit Women Beyond Borders (WBB). Determined to “make art as if the world matters,” Serena and her friends fell upon the idea of box as metaphor: hope chest, treasure chest, womb, coffin, etc. They replicated a miniature wooden box no bigger than the size of a human heart and sent the boxes to curators and friends in other countries with the goal of encouraging dialogue, collaboration and community among women and honoring creativity. The founders of WBB were astonished at what came back to them – eloquent expressions of the enormous depth and variety, but also the universality, of women’s experiences throughout the world. The boxes were accompanied by equally astonishing artists’ statements, in the form of letters, poems and stories asking about transcending barriers: geographical, social, racial, economic, emotional, gender-related, spiritual, etc. Written by Claire Bowman, Karyl Lynn Burns, Lauren Pattenand Beverly Ward, and directed by Jenny Sullivan, it runs April 27 through June 2 at the Rubicon Theatre in Ventura. For tickets call 805-667-2900 or visit www.rubicontheatre.org.

 

Enjoy life more – see a show tonight!

“Scene in LA” March 2019 by Steve Zall and Sid Fish

Here are some of the shows you can see in our local theaters this month:

“Attack of the Second Bananas” Who killed beloved stage stars Ruby Moss and Andrea Hammond? Find out as the LAPD detective on the case pieces together the clues. Attack of the Second Bananas is a comedy noir about the ultimate price of fame. Written by Gina Torrecilla, and directed by Ryan Bergmann, it runs March 1 through March 31 at the Zephyr Theatre in West Hollywood. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.brownpapertickets.com.

“Fifty Words” Adam and Jan are alone together for the first time in almost 10 years. Without the buffer of their nine-year-old son (who is away at his first-ever sleepover), this smoothly scripted multi-layered play reveals how closely love and hate can be linked in marriage … how with each problem experienced as parents, each subsequent layer that’s revealed shows yet another problem in their marriage. The play is an incisive close-up of the emotional battleground of contemporary relationships and the lengths to which a couple will go to save it. Written by Michael Weller, and directed by Shane Stevens, it runs March 1 through April 7 at the Lounge Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.fiftywords.brownpapertickets.com.

“Blues for Mister Charlie” Richard, a black man who is a former junkie returns to his parochial southern town and infuriates the denizens with his incendiary talk and actions. When he is killed by a poor, illiterate, white man, the murder, the eulogy, the trial, and the acquittal are presented in an abstract dramatic form of time, fury, and passion. Written by James Baldwin, and directed by Tor Brown, it runs March 2 through April 7 at the Loft Ensemble in Sherman Oaks. For tickets call 818-616-3150 or visit www.loftensemble.org.

“Hamlet” as we’ve never seen it before: Five actors of different races, genders and ages will all play Hamlet for one act each in this new production that explores the universal nature of this singular character that still haunts and resonates within us all. Written by William Shakespeare, and directed by Matthew Leavitt, it runs March 2 through March 31 at the New American Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets visit www.hamletla.eventbrite.com.

“Home” Desperately seeking approval from her Chinese Toisan immigrant family, Nancy journeys away from her home in New York City’s Chinatown in search of the American dream — only to learn that you can only find “home” when you accept where you come from. Written by Nancy Ma, and directed by Geoffrey Rivas, it runs March 2 through March 24 at the Los Angeles Theatre Center in Los Angeles. For tickets call 866-811-4111 or visit www.thelatc.org.

“The Old Man and the Old Moon” is a one-of-a-kind theatrical experience is the touching tale of a man charged with the task of keeping the moon shining bright. A mysterious disappearance sends him on an epic adventure over land, sea and sky and ultimately reminds him — and us — of the unwavering power of love. Written by PigPen Theatre Co., with music by PigPen Theatre Co., and directed by Stuart Carden, it runs March 2 through March 17 at the Wallis Annenberg Center for Performing Arts in Beverly Hills. For tickets call 310-746-4000 or visit www.TheWallis.org/OldMan.

“Too Much Sun” Celebrated actress Audrey Langham reaches her breaking point while rehearsing Medea in Chicago — walking off the stage, out of the production and into her married daughter’s summer house in Cape Cod, where her unexpected and unwelcome arrival sets off a chain of events alternately hilarious and harrowing. Written by Nicky Silver, and directed by Bart DeLorenzo, it runs March 2 through April 28 at the Odyssey Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-477-2055 Ext. 2 or visit www.OdysseyTheatre.com.

“Photograph 51” The story follows Franklin, a British science pioneer, whose groundbreaking role in the discovery of DNA’s double-helix structure in the 1950s is still often overlooked. Based on a true story, Photograph 51 offers an intriguing portrait of a complex, courageous woman who makes her way in a male-dominated field. As rival teams of researchers compete for a breakthrough, Franklin—focused and unbending—is locked in a race of her own. Written by Anna Ziegler, and directed by Kimberly Senior, it runs March 3 through March 24 at the South Coast Repertory’s Julianne Argyros Stage in Costa Mesa. For tickets call 714-708-5555 or visit www.scr.org.

“My Big Gay Italian Wedding” Anthony Pinnunziato loves Andrew Polinski and has proposed to him. Anthony’s very traditional Italian mother, Angela, insists that they have a Catholic wedding with Father Rosalia presiding. Given the Vatican’s position on same-sex marriages, this presents a challenge. Angela also insists that Andrew’s mother fly in from Florida to attend the wedding, set to take place in the fanciest Italian restaurant. But Andrew’s mother still refuses to talk to her gay son. The biggest challenge of all may come from Gregorio, Andrew’s spurned ex-lover. He threatens to scuttle the proceedings by revealing a nasty secret about Andrew. Will a large, loving Italian family come together, despite multiple obstacles, to celebrate the marriage of two men deeply in love? Written by Anthony Wilkinson, and directed by Gianfranco Terrin, it runs March 8 through March 31 at the Hudson Theatre Main Stage in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-481-6890 or visit www.italiancomedyclub.com/mbgiw.

“Paradise” What is the science behind first love? Two outsiders, a gifted Yemeni-American teenager at a poorly rated high school in the South Bronx and her disillusioned biology teacher, form an unlikely scientific partnership in the hope of securing her a scholarship. But when conflicts arise over differences in religion, culture and the boundaries of mentorship, their capacity to alter the course of each other’s lives becomes greater than either had imagined. Written by Laura Maria Censabella, and directed by Vicangelo Bulluck, it runs March 8 through March 31 at the Matrix Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-960-7724 or visit www.Plays411.com/Paradise.

 

“Black Super Hero Magic Mama” When Sabrina loses her 14-year-old son Tramarion to a police shooting, she is unable to face the ensuing flurry of media attention. Crippled by grief, she retreats into a fantasy world of superheroes and arch villains that inhabit the comic book created by her son before his death. Assuming the role of the Maasai Angel rather than the expected part of grieving mother, Sabrina battles her enemies along the way to peace. Written by Inda Craig-Galván, and directed by Robert O’Hara, it runs March 13 through April 14 at the Audrey Skirball Kenis Theater at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-208-5454 or visit www.geffenplayhouse.org.

“The Shape of Things” is set in a small university town in the American Midwest and centers on the lives of four young students who become emotionally and romantically involved. How far would you go for love? For art? What would you be willing to change? What price might you pay? Such are the painful questions explored in the play. A young student drifts into an ever-changing relationship with an art major while his best friend’s engagement crumbles, unleashing a drama that peels back the skin of two modern-day relationships. Written by Neil LaBute, and directed by David Conolly, it runs March 14 through March 24 at the Theatre of Arts at Arena Stage in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-860-4356 or visit www.toa.edu.

“The Sound of Murder” Charles Norbury is a wildly successful author of children’s books. He hates children, and pretty much anyone else, too. He’s petty, cruel, vindictive, and treats his unloved wife like a slave. He also refuses to have children with her. In short, he’s the sort of fellow who would make the world a better place if only he would just die. Anne, the wife, has found some solace in the arms of her handsome lover, Peter. Charles won’t grant her a divorce: It would damage him professionally with the parents of his juvenile fans. The one person who has real regard for Charles is his loyal secretary, Miss Forbes. She is infatuated with Peter. Anne and Peter deduce that the only way they will ever be to be together forever is if they kill Charles. They come up with a scheme to effect his murder. But things just don’t go according to plan. Written by William Fairchild, and directed by Adrian Neil, it runs March 14 through April 14 at the Theatre Forty, in the Reuben Cordova Theatre in Beverly Hills. For tickets call 310-364-0535 or visit www.theatre40.org.

 

“Friends with Guns” You think you know your friends, your neighbors, your spouse, but what happens when you suddenly find out they have a garage full of guns? This new dark comedy explores the complicated issue of gun proliferation when two young liberal couples are forced to confront their assumptions about who should own a gun and why. The time of easy answers regarding this issue is long gone. In the wake of current events, we are all forced to reexamine our strongly held beliefs about gun ownership. It explores the question of what we can compartmentalize…and what we can’t. It examines what happens when guns enter the conversation. It pulls the curtain back on liberals with guns. It asks what happens when suddenly one person in a marriage does a 180 on the gun issue. And it does all of this through a female lens. Written by Stephanie Alison Walker, and directed by Randee Trabitz, it runs March 15 through May 5 at the Road on Magnolia in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-761-8838 or visit www.roadtheatre.org.

 

“Sunday in the Park with George” the plot revolves around the creation of his masterpiece, “A Sunday Afternoon on the Island of La Grande Jatte.” George, an intense and passionate artist, struggles to not only create his paintings but also to maintain a relationship with his long-time mistress, Dot. The second act connects to the first while focusing on another George, Seurat and Dot’s great grandson, also struggling to find meaning in art and the need to connect to the past, present and future. ”A white canvas, so many possibilities”. Written by James Lapine, with music by Stephen Sondheim, and directed by Susan Goldman Weisbarth, it runs March 15 through April 20 at the Westchester Playhouse in Westchester. For tickets call 310-645-5156 or visit www.kentwoodplayers.org.

“Tangerine Sunset” Every paradise has a dark side. This is the story of a group of unlucky souls who find themselves the involuntary guests of a palatial estate on a mysterious private island. These celebrities, billionaires, madmen, and innocents desperately try to survive the night with their lives and sanity intact. Written by Peter Fluet, and directed by JJ Mayes, it runs March 15 through April 13 at the Broadwater Theater Complex in Los Angeles. For tickets visit www.sacredfools.org.

“The Wolves” Left quad. Right quad. Lunge. A girl’s indoor soccer team warms up. From the safety of their suburban stretch circle, these 16- and 17-year-olds navigate big questions and wage tiny battles with the ferociousness of a pack of adolescent warriors. Written by Sarah DeLappe, and directed by Alana Dietze, it runs March 16 through April 22 at the Atwater Village Theatre in Atwater Village. For tickets call 310-307-3753 or visit www.EchoTheaterCompany.com.

“Argonautika” In this fresh retelling of the classic Greek myth, Jason and his quest for the Golden Fleece has been reframed for our time. Join the fantastic voyage and encounter Hercules, Hera, sirens, centaurs, and more—familiar mythological figures imbued with unexpected character and depth. Written by Mary Zimmerman, and directed by Julia Rodriguez-Elliot, it runs March 20 through May 5 at the A Noise Within in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-356-3100 or visit www.anoisewithin.org.

“Ada and the Engine” As the British Industrial Revolution dawns, young Ada Byron Lovelace (daughter of the flamboyant and notorious Lord Byron) sees the boundless creative potential in the “analytic engines” of her friend and soulmate, Charles Babbage, inventor of the first mechanical computer. Ada envisions a whole new world where art and information converge––a world she might not live to see. It’s a music-laced story of love, friendship, and the edgiest dreams of the future. Written by Lauren Gunderson, and directed by Heidi Powers, it runs March 21 through March 31 at the studio/stage in Los Angeles. For tickets visit www.theatreunleashed.org.

“The Elephant Man” based upon the life of a man so physically deformed that he became known as the “Elephant Man.” With very few options open to him, John Merrick is forced to display himself to the public in travelling sideshows. Written by Bernard Pomerance, and directed by Robyn Cohen, it runs March 21 through April 14 at the El Portal Theatre in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-508-4200 or visit www.ElPortalTheatre.com.

 

“Matilda the Musical” With inspiring and fun songs, this extraordinary girl will show you how a sharp mind and vivid imagination can help you change your destiny! Written by Roald Dahl, adapted by Dennis Kelly, with music by Tim Minchin, and directed by Lewis Wilkenfeld, it runs March 22 through March 31 at the Kavli Theatre at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza in Thousand Oaks. For tickets call 800-745-3000 or visit www.5startheatricals.com.

“Steel Magnolias” Set in a small-town beauty salon in Louisiana, Steel Magnolias celebrates the bond of friendship between six women in the midst of life’s challenges. Written by Robert Harling, and directed by Cameron Watson, it runs March 22 through May 5 at the Actors Co-op David Schall Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-462-8460 or visit www.ActorsCo-op.org.

“Bar Mitzvah Boy” Joey Brant is a Jewish divorce lawyer in his 60s. He has never had a bar mitzvah ceremony. He feels the need to get one now, before his grandson has his bar mitzvah. For reasons which will become clear in the story, Joey’s bar mitzvah ceremony must take place at the synagogue he attended five decades ago. Joey, a thoroughly secularized man, must now re-connect with the faith of his ancestors. He promptly alienates the synagogue’s regular instructor, which means that Joey must now go to the temple’s rabbi for his bar mitzvah lessons. Rabbi Michael Levitz-Sharon, a woman, finds her faith challenged at the same time that Joey is rediscovering his spiritual roots. her 11-year-old devoutly Jewish daughter has contracted terminal cancer. The daughter, Rachel, wants nothing more than to live long enough to be bat-mitzvahed. The impending tragedy is taking its toll on Rabbi Michael’s marriage. Will Joey at long last have his bar mitzvah and find his faith? Can Rabbi Michael retain her beliefs? Written by Mark Leiren-Young, and directed by Howard Teichman, it runs March 23 through May 12 at the Miles Memorial Playhouse in Santa Monica. For tickets call 323-821-2449 or visit www.wcjt.org.

“Faith Healer” about the life and times of an itinerant Irish healer. Is Fantastic Francis Hardy a miracle worker — or a showman in search of a dollar? Written by Brian Friel, and directed by Ron Sossi, it runs March 23 through May 12 at the Odyssey Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-477-2055 Ext. 2 or visit www.OdysseyTheatre.com.

“The Mother of Henry” Five diverse employees in the return department at Sears form a tight bond as they cope with upheaval in their personal lives, their community and the rapidly changing world around them during the course of one tumultuous and historic year – 1968. Connie, a Latinx single working-class mother, realizes her agency and discovers her true identity when the anxieties of war, civil unrest and political assassinations plaguing the country tragically affect her own life. Written by Evelina Fernández, and directed by José Luis Valenzuela, it runs March 23 through April 14 at the Los Angeles Theatre Center in Los Angeles. For tickets call 866-811-4111 or visit www.thelatc.org.

“The Meatball Chronicles” follows one woman through humorous and sometimes heart wrenching meals that align with stories of her childhood, her relationships with men, and in particular, her complicated relationship to her mother. Mansini crafts this piece in a way that transcends her own story into universal themes that anyone who has a family can love. As she kneads the dough and thickens the sauce through each Italian recipe, the stories associated with those recipes reveal the complex ways that families cope, laugh, grieve, and show their love through food. Written by Debrianna Mansini, it runs March 29 through April 14 at the Hudson Guild Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets visit www.onstage411.com/meatball.

“The Secret of Chimneys” In this mystery, a cosmopolitan adventurer on a mission discovers more than he bargained for when he arrives at an English country house and finds himself in the center of a murderous international conspiracy. This sinister plot of stolen diamonds, secret oil concessions and exiled royalty unfolds under the purview of both Scotland Yard and the French Surete. Chimneys is Christie at her best: a comedy of manners laced with murder! Written by Agatha Christie, and directed by Jules Aaron, it runs March 29 through May 5 at the Lonny Chapman Theatre in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-763-5990 or visit www.thegrouprep.com.

“BRUSHES: A Comedy of Hairs” untangles the hysterically complicated relationship between women and their hair since time immemorial. Brushes with disaster, vanity, envy, self-doubt, sex, death – even the law – are explored in hilarious and poignant style. In a series of vignettes, the follicular follies flow from the Bad Hair Days Inn to a new salon on the block called Blow Me Now. Written by Cathy Hamilton and Carol Starr Schneider, and directed by Kevin Bailey, it runs March 30 through May 4 at the Whitefire Theatre in Sherman Oaks. For tickets visit www.brushes.brownpapertickets.com.

“Heisenberg” In a bustling London train station free-spirited American Georgie unexpectedly plants a kiss on the neck of mid-70s British butcher Alex. When she turns up in his shop a few days later, she sets the suspicious man’s world reeling. As Alex is drawn into Georgie’s anarchic world, his conventional life becomes chaotic, uncertain, and undeniably richer. Peeling away the many layers of everyday relationships with subtle humor and quiet poeticism, HEISENBERG brings to poignant theatrical life the uncertain and often comical sparring match that is human connection. Written by Simon Stephens, and directed by Katherine Farmer, it runs March 31 through April 14 at the Laguna Playhouse in Laguna Beach. For tickets call 949-497-2787 or visit www.lagunaplayhouse.com.

“Lemur Mom” Megan Dolan has the distinct feeling that she’s not the right mom. As she navigates the treacherous world of support groups, child psychologists, and play-dates trying to help her son communicate, she makes countless wrong turns along the way. This hilarious and hopeful solo show explores the power of resilience, kindness, and the value of showing up. Megan forges a path from believing she’s the wrong mom to knowing she’s the only mom for her unique and gifted son. Written by Megan Dolan, and directed by Wendy Hammers, it runs March 31 through June 2 at the Whitefire Theatre in Sherman Oaks. For tickets visit www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3570240.

 

Enjoy life more – see a show tonight!

“Scene in LA” February 2019 by Steve Zall and Sid Fish

Here are some of the shows you can see in our local theaters this month:

“The Importance of Being Earnest” features two carefree bachelors, Jack and Algernon, each with a carefully hidden double life. But when Algernon discovers that Jack has been posing as a man named Ernest to escape to the city, he promptly travels to Jack’s country estate to pose as the fictional figure himself! Silliness ensues with whimsical ingénues, jealous fiancées, indomitable dowagers, and the most famous handbag in theatre history. Written by Oscar Wilde, and directed by Michael Marchak, it runs February 1 through March 31 at the Crown City Theatre Company in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-605-5685 or visit www.crowncitytheatre.com.

“Too Heavy for Your Pocket” In rural Tennessee at the height of the Civil Rights Movement, two young African-American couples struggle to understand justice, love, and their own responsibilities. It beautifully explores the sacrifices and tolls in the fight for freedom and equality that are placed, not only on the fighters, but the people they love. Written by Jiréh Breon Holder, and directed by Michael Shepperd, it runs February 1 through March 2 at the Black Box Theater space of the Broadwater Theater Complex in Los Angeles. For tickets visit www.sacredfools.org.

“Accidental Death of an Anarchist” a madman, who invades a police station interrogation room where an anarchist accused of bombing a railway station has recently “accidentally” fallen out of a window. Donning various disguises and voices, the madman manipulates policemen into a truth-inducing hysteria. Written by Dario Fo, and directed by Will Thomas McFadden, it runs February 2 through March 9 at the Actors’ Gang Theatre at Ivy Substation in Culver City. For tickets call 310-838-4264 or visit www.TheActorsGang.com.

“Heisenberg” Sweet, sexy and full of surprises, the story follows two strangers whose lives intersect in a bustling London train station. Free-spirited Georgie, an American in her 40s, unexpectedly plants a kiss on the neck of Alex, an Irish butcher in his 70s. She doesn’t really know why. Or does she? When Georgie turns up in Alex’s shop a few days later, full of contradictions, his conventional life becomes chaotic, uncertain and undeniably richer. Peeling away the many layers of everyday relationships with subtle humor and quiet poeticism, this story brings to poignant theatrical life the uncertain and sometimes comical sparring match that is human connection. Written by Simon Stephens, and directed by Katharine Farmer, it runs February 2 through February 17 at the Rubicon Theatre Company in Ventura. For tickets call 805-667-2900 or visit www.rubicontheatre.org.

“Two Trains Running” It’s 1969 in Pittsburgh’s Hill District, where the regulars of Memphis Lee’s restaurant struggle to cope with the turbulence of a world that is rapidly changing around them. With compassion, humor and a superb sense of place and time, it paints a vivid portrait of everyday lives in the shadow of great events. Written by August Wilson, and directed by Michele Shay, it runs February 2 through March 3 at the Matrix Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 855-326-9945 or visit www.augustwilsonstwotrainsrunning.eventbrite.com.

“Whoopsie-Doopsie!” a quirky comedy about a popular, smart, good-looking guy whose world is turned upside down when his girlfriend delivers unwelcomed information. Written and directed by Art Shulman, it runs February 2 through March 3 at the Upstairs at the Group Rep in the Lonny Chapman Theatre in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-763-5990 or visit www.thegrouprep.com.

“Julia Sweeney: Older and Wider” is a hilarious take on parenting, religion, cancer, feminism and even her iconic characters’ place in today’s modern landscape. It’s an evening of laughter with one of comedy’s most indelible, indestructible voices. Written and directed by Julia Sweeney, it runs February 5 through February 10 at the Audrey Skirball Kenis Theater at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-208-5454 or visit www.geffenplayhouse.org.

“Ragtime: The Musical” begins with an unforgettable sweeping, nine-minute opening number in which all strata of society of the early twentieth century are introduced: immigrant Jews in their ghetto, successful rich Protestants, and African Americans. The fictional characters – pianist Coalhouse Walker Jr., his child’s mother Sarah – who has become part of a respected family headed by the white Father and Mother – and a Latvian immigrant Tateh, are eventually joined by a parade of historic figures — Evelyn Nesbit, Booker T. Washington, J. P. Morgan, Henry Ford, Stanford White, Admiral Peary, Matthew Henson, Emma Goldman and even Harry Houdini – in this much appreciated and well-remembered musical. Written by Terrence McNally, with music by Stephen Flaherty, lyrics by Lynn Ahrens, and directed by David Lee, it runs February 5 through March 3 at the Pasadena Playhouse in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-356-7529 or visit www.pasadenaplayhouse.org.

“Witness Uganda” follows Griffin, a New York City-based American volunteer, as he arrives in Uganda to help build a village school and escape his church’s condemnation of his sexuality. When he falls into a complicated relationship with a group of destitute, orphaned teenagers, he finds himself driven by a mission that will change his and their lives forever. From the rolling hills of the Ugandan countryside to a stifling apartment in New York City, from a joyous celebration of African youth to a terrifying abduction 8,000 miles away, it explores the question, “is changing the world even possible?” Written by Matt Gould and Griffin Matthews, with music by Matt Gould, and directed by Griffin Matthews, it runs February 5 through February 24 at the Wallis Annenberg Center for Performing Arts Lovelace Studio Theater in Beverly Hills. For tickets call 310-746-4000 or visit www.TheWallis.org/Witness.

“The Mountaintop” takes place on the night of April 3, 1968. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. has just given one of his most impassioned and famous speeches to support sanitation workers during an intense strike in Memphis. Known as his “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” speech, he spoke as if he knew what might happen the next day. It is a dark night, and lighting and thunder crack the sky. Room 306, the Lorraine Motel. Tonight, it is just another stopover motel for Dr. King. Tomorrow, it becomes the scene of one of our nation’s greatest losses. Water stains pockmark the walls. Bright orange and fading brown sixties décor accent the room. The carpet is the color of bile. Dr. King, tired and hungry, wants cigarettes and coffee. But mostly he is weary. Written by Katori Hall, and directed by Gregg T. Daniel, it runs February 6 through March 10 at the Garry Marshall Theatre in Burbank. For tickets call 818-955-8101 or visit www.garrymarshalltheatre.org.

“Man of God” A hidden discovery in a hotel bathroom changes the lives of four Korean Christian girls on a mission trip to Thailand. Samantha is hurt that someone she trusted could betray her. Jen is worried about how this might affect her college applications. Kyung-Hwa thinks everyone should adjust their expectations. Mimi’s out for blood. Amid the neon lights and go-go bars in Bangkok, the girls plot revenge in this funny, feminist thriller. Written by Anna Moench, and directed by Jesca Prudencio, it runs February 7 through February 24 at the David Henry Hwang Theater in Los Angeles. For tickets call 213-625-7000 or visit www.eastwestplayers.org.

“1776 The Musical” the electrifying musical about the founding of America. Featuring a thrilling cast, this Tony Award-winning smash begins with a deadlocked Congress. Its attempts to adopt the Declaration of Independence are boiling over in heated confrontations. Sound familiar? Spoiler alert: by the evening of July 2nd, the two sides are still miles apart! Written by Peter Stone, with music by Sherman Edwards, and directed by Glenn Casale, it runs February 8 through February 10 at the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Center for the Performing Arts in Northridge. For tickets call 818-677-3000 or visit www.TheSoraya.org.

“Anna Karenina” an upside-down telling of Tolstoy’s classic tale, this eight-person dramatic event is a fast-paced examination of love, adultery and marriage. Written by Helen Edmundson, adapted from the novel by Leo Tolstoy, and directed by Heather Chesley, it runs February 8 through March 17 at the Actors Co-op Crossley Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-462-8460 or visit www.ActorsCo-op.org.

“Church Basement Ladies” Ever wonder what goes on in a church basement kitchen and the women who work there? Come see Church Basement Ladies, a hilarious musical comedy and meet the women who navigate relationships and solve all the problems of their rural Minnesota church congregation. Experience a record-breaking annual holiday Lutefisk dinner, the funeral of a dear friend, a Hawaiian Easter fundraiser and a steaming hot July wedding! Funny and down to earth, from the elderly matriarch to the young bride-to-be, her meddling mother and the strikingly charming pastor. Witness a church year as it unfolds from below the house of God! Written by Jim Stowell and Jessica Zuehlke, with music by Drew Jansen, and directed by George Stratten, it runs February 8 through March 9 at the Glendale Centre Theatre in Glendale. For tickets call 818-244-8481 or visit www.glendalecentretheatre.com.

“Miss America’s Ugly Daughter: Bess Myerson & Me” is a fascinating account of growing up a confused ugly duckling in the shadow of a spectacular mother. An awkward, chubby kid with frizzy hair, buck teeth and no obvious talent, Barra was beauty queen Myerson’s only child. The first and only Jewish Miss America, Myerson was famous — an accomplished pianist, television personality, New York City’s first Commissioner of Consumer Affairs, a close advisor to Mayor Ed Koch, and a national spokesperson against anti-Semitism — until she became infamous, falling in love with the wrong man and going down with her Mafia boyfriend in a judge-bribing scandal. In the play, Barra takes us on the journey of her life: a feisty struggle as she tries to fit in at school, meet the right man, find a career and forge her own place in the universe. But Bess (voiced off stage by Piper) is ever-present, fixated on “improving” Barra by molding her into a version of herself. Written by Barra Grant, with music by Mark Adler, and directed by Eve Brandstein, it runs February 8 through March 24 at the Greenway Court Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-285-2078 or visit www.MissAmericasUglyDaughter.com.

“Airport Encounters: Brace for Impact!” is a comedic anthology of inter-connected vignettes centered around a central hub that take a hard and hysterical look at human behaviors and the problems we face, all in real time as both weary and excited passengers pass through an airport and onto their next adventure. Featuring individual stories of the eclectic but all too familiar passengers written by a team of top writers, the stories comprise a bigger picture, a full show in itself, making for a truly unique theatrical experience from Neo Ensemble Theatre. Written by Elayne Heilveil, Mark Harvey Levine, Scott Mullen, Beth Polsky, Jessica Rowe and Rom Watson, and directed by June Carryl, David Bickford, Valerie Gould, Joe Ochman, Richard Pierce, Matthew Singletary and Lauren Smerkanich, it runs February 9 through February 24 at the Lounge Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets visit www.neoensembletheatre.org.

“Death of a Salesman” is a haunting and moving portrait of a man whose belief in, and pursuit of, the American dream ends in tatters. Written by Arthur Miller, and directed by Joseph Hanreddy, it runs February 9 through February 24 at the New Vic in Santa Barbara. For tickets call 805-965-5400 or visit www.etcsb.org.

“The Servant of Two Masters” Lombardi’s son Silvio loves Clarice, but her father, Pantalone, has promised her to the wealthy dung merchant Federigo Rasponi, who is really Beatrice Aretusi disguised as a man searching for her lover, the tango teacher Florindo, so they can run off and open a dance studio in Brooklyn. It’s complicated. Written by Carlo Goldoni, and directed by Lance Davis, it runs February 9 through March 10 at the Parson’s Nose Theater in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-403-7667 or visit www.parsonsnose.com.

“Lights Out: Nat “King” Cole” imagines Nat “King” Cole as he faces the final Christmastime broadcast of his groundbreaking variety show and weighs the advice of his friend Sammy Davis Jr. to “go out with a bang.” Cole’s hit songs, such as “Nature Boy,” “It’s a Good Day” and “Smile,” underscore this boldly original homage to the renowned performer who struggled to break through America’s color barrier in the early days of television. Written by Colman Domingo and Patricia McGregor, and directed by Patricia McGregor, it runs February 13 through March 17 at the Gil Cates Theater at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-208-5454 or visit www.geffenplayhouse.org.

“Born to Win” Pinky Corningfield has always dreamed of her daughter winning the “Supreme Queen.” So when Marge, a newcomer to the child pageant circuit, shows up with her daughter and starts grabbing all the glory, Pinky will stop at nothing to get the crown. Written by Matthew Wilkas and Mark Setlock, and directed by Michael Matthews, it runs February 15 through March 31 at the Celebration Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-957-1884 or visit www.celebrationtheatre.com.

“A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder” is the knock-’em-dead, uproarious romp filled with unforgettable music and non-stop laughs. When the low born Monty Navarro finds out that he’s eighth in line for an earldom in the lofty D’Ysquith family, he figures his chances of outliving his predecessors are slight and sets off down a far more murderous path. Can he knock off his unsuspecting relatives without being caught and become the ninth Earl of Highhurst? And what of love? This fun musical follows him on his adventures that will change the course of his future. Written by Robert L. Freedman, with music by Steve Lutvaki, lyrics by Robert L. Freedman and Steve Lutvaki, and directed by Peggy Hickey, it runs February 15 through March 3 at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts in Cerritos. For tickets call 562-916-8500 or visit www.Cerritoscenter.com.

“The Joy Wheel” Life is changing for Frank and Stella. On the night of Frank’s retirement party, this once loving and simple couple find themselves pulled in different directions as the winds of change blow through Joy, Illinois. The world is not what it was. Joy is not what it was. Stella is shaken, but inspired, by her best friend becoming a liberated, sexualized, independent woman, while Frank decides to emulate his doomsday prepper friend by building an underground bunker that once was the family swimming pool. It’s as if all of them are riding the Joy Wheel, hanging on to someone else so they can stay their ground. Written by Ian McRae, and directed by Jason Alexander, it runs February 15 through March 24 at the Ruskin Group Theatre in Santa Monica. For tickets call 310-397-3244 or visit www.ruskingrouptheatre.com.

“America Adjacent” In pursuit of the American Dream, six pregnant Filipina women risk everything. Confined to a one-bedroom one-bath unit in East Hollywood, they do their best to overcome fears of jail and deportation so that their children can have a better life. Playwright Boni B. Alvarez examines the promise of US Citizenship asking, “How far would we go to give our children a better future?” Written by Boni B. Alvarez, and directed by Jon Lawrence Rivera, it runs February 16 through March 24 at the Skylight Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 213-761-7061 or visit www.SkylightTix.org.

“How We’re Different from Animals” Over three years in the making, ÉLAN Ensemble’s inaugural production is the culmination of the company’s work, adapting Miranda July’s book of short stories “No One Belongs Here More Than You.” The show breathes life into July’s quirky, lonely, odd, lovable characters in an oddly hilarious tapestry that reflects the complexity, isolation, and unexpected connectivity of life in Los Angeles. Written by Miranda July, and directed by Jonathan Muñoz-Proulx, it runs February 22 through March 24 at the Atwater Village Theatre in Atwater Village. For tickets call 310-990-2023 or visit www.elanensemble.com.

“Life Could Be a Dream” SH-BOOM! Meet fledgling doo-wop singing group the Crooning Crabcakes as they prepare to enter the Big Whopper Radio contest and realize their dreams of making it to the big time. The ’60s doo-wop songs in this award-winning jukebox musical say it all: “Fools Fall in Love,” “Tears on My Pillow,” “Runaround Sue,” “Earth Angel,” “Stay,” “Unchained Melody,” “Lonely Teardrops” and “The Glory of Love.” Written by Roger Bean, with music by Bill Wolfe, and directed by Jamie Torcellini, it runs February 22 through March 10 at the International City Theatre in Long Beach. For tickets call 562-436-4610 or visit www.InternationalCityTheatre.org.

“Hype Man” A hip-hop trio – frontman, hype man and beat maker – is on the verge of making it big on national TV when a police shooting of a black teen shakes the band to its core, forcing them to confront questions of race, gender, privilege and when to use artistic expression as an act of social protest. Written by Idris Goodwin, and directed by Deena Selenow, it runs February 23 through April 14 at the Fountain Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-663-1525 or visit www.FountainTheatre.com.

“The Judas Kiss” In spring of 1895, Oscar Wilde was larger than life. His masterpiece, The Importance of Being Earnest, was a hit in the West End and he was the toast of London. Yet by summer he was serving two years in prison for gross indecency. Punished for “the love that dare not speak its name,” Wilde remained devoted to his beloved, Lord Alfred “Bosie” Douglas. This story revolves around two pivotal moments in his life: the day when, cajoled by Bosie into an ill-fated trial, he decides to stay in England and face imprisonment, and a night when, after his release two years later, the lover for whom he risked everything betrays him again. Written by David Hare, and directed by Michael Michetti, it runs February 23 through March 24 at the Boston Court in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-683-6801 or visit www.BostonCourtPasadena.org.

“Tuesdays with Morrie” Mitch Albom, on his graduation day from Brandeis University, promises to stay in touch with his beloved sociology professor, Morrie Schwartz. Mitch gets busy with life and doesn’t keep his promise. At first, he’s a jazz pianist, but abandons that career when he becomes successful as a sports journalist and sportscaster. One night, he sees Morrie on ABC-TV’s Nightline with Ted Koppel. Morrie’s joie de vivre in the face of his challenges from Lou Gehrig’s Disease captivates the Nightline audience. Mitch re-connects with Morrie, flying in to see him ultimately every Tuesday (hence this play’s title). In the time that Morrie has left, he will equip Mitch for his life ahead. Written by Jeffrey Hatcher and Mitch Albom, and directed by L. Flint Esquerra, it runs February 23 through March 31 at the Sierra Madre Playhouse in Sierra Madre. For tickets call 626-355-4318 or visit www.sierramadreplayhouse.org.

“Blues in the Night” The 26 hot and torchy numbers – by icons Bessie Smith, Duke Ellington, Johnny Mercer, Harold Arlen and more – tell of the sweet, sexy and sorrowful experiences that three women have with the lying, cheating, snake of a man, who represents the men who do them wrong. Written and directed by Sheldon Epps, with music by Abdul Hamid Royal, it runs February 24 through March 10 at the Laguna Playhouse in Laguna Beach. For tickets call 949-497-2787 or visit www.lagunaplayhouse.com.

“1=0” An unemployed, divorced theoretical physicist has an online relationship with a man claiming to be a Syrian refugee. When the relationship goes offline, it paradoxically becomes less real. Written by Joshua Fardon, and directed by James R. Carey, it runs February 28 through March 30 at the Theatre of NOTE in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-856-8611 or visit www.theatreofnote.com.

“Canyon” In a backyard deep within a canyon during Labor Day weekend 2016 — before everything in America changed — we meet a newlywed couple and a Mexican father and son as they all try their best to find a better view. An immersive staging of this driving new play takes a look at what happens when two families are rocked by an unpredictable accident that changes their lives forever. A look at gender, citizenship, and the costs of trying to live a conventional American life. Written by Jonathan Caren, and directed by Whitney White, it runs February 28 through March 24 at the Los Angeles Theatre Center in Los Angeles. For tickets call 866-811-4111 or visit www.thelatc.org.

Enjoy life more – see a show tonight!

“Scene in LA” January 2019 by Steve Zall and Sid Fish

Happy New Year! Here are some of the shows you can see in our local theaters this month:

“A Bundle of Trouble” An inventor’s life crumbles when his estranged, precocious 8 year-old daughter comes to live with him. She unravels this charming curmudgeon’s home, work, and heart. Written by Ruth Hale, adapted by James Castle Stevens, and directed by James Castle Stevens, it runs January 4 through February 2 at the Glendale Centre Theatre in Glendale. For tickets call 818-244-8481 or visit www.glendalecentretheatre.com.

“A Misunderstanding” Leave all your preconceived notions at the door: this play is sure to turn them inside out. A playful play of ideas that challenges our understanding of reality while asking the question, Can two people fundamentally disagree and continue to love one another? Written by Matt Chait, and directed by Elina de Santos, it runs January 4 through February 3 at the Complex (Ruby Theatre) in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-960-4418 or visit www.plays411.com/misunderstanding.

“Soul -Crushing Disco Ball” Killer Kisses, STD Clinics, Marriage…DIVORCE. Sometimes women cause men “lots of pain,” so when a school-yard rumor spreads that one female student has committed manslaughter, two third-grade boys join forces to stop the bleeding by forming a friendship that spans three decades worth of debacles at the hands of the opposite sex. It’s true. Being a best friend can be a soul-crushing job, but one that also comes with surprising benefits. Written by Travis Perkins and Chambers Stevens, and directed by Chambers Stevens, it runs January 4 through February 24 at the Hudson Backstage Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-960-7822 or visit www.plays411.com/discoball.

“Desert Rats” dark comedy about life and crime in America’s contemporary West. Estranged brothers Frank and Jesse reunite to plan a kidnapping in a squalid motel room on a hellish day in Barstow. When day turns into night and their hostage is brought out of the trunk, the siblings find their troubles have just begun. Written by Nate Rufus Edelman, and directed by Angie Scott, it runs January 5 through January 20 at the Los Angeles Theatre Center in Los Angeles. For tickets call 866-811-4111 or visit www.thelatc.org.

“Forever Brooklyn” is the story of Melvin Kaplofkis, a young man growing up in Brooklyn in the 1950s who emerges in the 1960s as Mel King, The King of Brooklyn. Young Mel entertains his family and friends by telling jokes and stories. He is championed by a local radio personality, and Mel begins to move up, with gigs in the Borscht Belt resorts. It turns out he actually has a flair for performing, and ultimately, he is booked for an appearance on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. Sounds like a dream, no? Well, not quite. His family doesn’t want him to leave Brooklyn. Also, he’s been pressed into service, against his will, as a bagman for the Mob that’s been ruling Brooklyn with an iron fist. The Mob doesn’t want Mel to leave Brooklyn behind. If he does, there will be a price to be paid. And, oh yes: Along the way, he falls in love. Written and directed by Mark Wesley Curran, it runs January 5 through February 9 at the Whitefire Theatre in Sherman Oaks. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3613939.

“Bat out of Hell the Musical” is a romantic adventure about rebellious youth and passionate love, set against the backdrop of a post-cataclysmic city adrift from the mainland. Strat, the forever-young leader of The Lost, has fallen for Raven, daughter of Falco, the tyrannical ruler of Obsidian. Written by Jim Steinman, with music by Jim Steinman, and directed by Jay Scheib, it runs January 8 through February 2 at the Ahmanson Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 213-972-4400 or visit www.AhmansonTheatre.org.

“Definition of Man” In the abstracted setting of a burnt-out, post-apocalyptic ruin, the cast of two serves as a stand-in for all of humanity while grappling with their own personal struggles to maintain a sense of self in a world that has ceased to exist. In a tightly-paced narrative progression, they move and shift between verbal and physical intimacy, exploring how these intersect and overlap from start to finish. Nameless but for their titles of XX and XY, they are both universal and specific, two sides of one coin, speaking from their own divergent experiences to reach a place of mutual understanding. Written by Nikki Muller, with music by Chris Thomas, and directed by JJ Mayes, it runs January 10 through January 27 at the Arena Theatre on the Cal State LA Campus in Los Angeles. For tickets visit www.dconstructionarts.org/shop.

“Smart Love” is a contemporary comedy with a scientific twist. The Wachowski household is turned upside down when their son makes a surprise visit home, from MIT, with an unexpected guest. How far will human beings go in order to salvage love? Written by Brian Letscher, and directed by Elina de Santos, it runs January 10 through February 24 at the Pacific Resident Theatre in Venice. For tickets call 310-822-8392 or visit www.pacificresidenttheatre.com.

 

“Jocasta: A Motherf**king Tragedy” An alcoholic tattoo artist, a kid who’s been swimming laps for 25 years, an ex-con, and a woman who believes she can see the future help Jocasta when she is awakened from a dream into a literal nightmare, discovering her husband Oedipus is also her son. This at once disturbing and darkly comic theatrical work, explores modern feminism, the nature of fate, and what it takes to regain control of one’s own destiny. Written and directed by Brian Weir, it runs January 11 through February 10 at the Broadwater Main Stage in Hollywood. For tickets call 310-281-8341 or visit www.ghostroad.org.

“Our Town” The residents of the small town of Grover’s Corners remain as universal and timeless as when they first appeared on stage in 1938. Written by Thornton Wilder, and directed by Stanley Brown, it runs January 11 through February 16 at the Westchester Playhouse in Westchester. For tickets call 310-645-5156 or visit www.kentwoodplayers.org.

“The Twelfth Night or What You Will” This is Illyria, folks! Our heroine is shipwrecked. Her brother is presumably drowned. Disguising herself as a boy, she joins Duke Orsino’s court. She is sent out as an emissary to the Countess Olivia, who is mourning the death of her brother. Olivia falls for the youth. Mistaken identity, gender confusion, a mordant clown, a pompous mayor domo, whackadoodle relatives (Sir Toby) – makes for a great deal of fun! Written by Williams Shakespeare, and directed by Sabrina Lloyd, it runs January 11 through February 17 at the Theatre Palisades Pierson Playhouse in Pacific Palisades. For tickets call 310-454-1970 or visit www.theatrepalisades.com.

 

“1776 the Musical” is the electrifying musical about the founding of America. Featuring a thrilling cast, this Tony Award-winning smash begins with a deadlocked Congress – sound familiar? Its attempts to adopt the Declaration of Independence are boiling over in heated confrontations. Spoiler alert: by the evening of July 2nd, the two sides are still miles apart! But remarkably, these contentious Founding Fathers harness their shared determination to do the right thing for a fledgling nation. See how they get it done! Engaging, tuneful, witty and passionate, this Broadway musical shows us the likes of John Adams, Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson as we’ve never seen them before — with humor and humanity. Written by Peter Stone, based on a concept by Sherman Edwards, with music by Sherman Edwards, and directed by Glenn Casale, it runs January 12 through February 3 at the La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts in La Mirada. For tickets call 562-944-9801 or visit www.lamiradatheatre.com.

“The Diary of Anne Frank” is one of the most famous and haunting stories to emerge from the 20th Century. The memoirs of this young Jewish girl, forced to hide for nearly two years to escape Nazi persecution, are an essential part of how we remember one of the darkest periods of our human history. Written by Frances Goodrich and Albert Hackett and newly adapted by Wendy Kesselman, and directed by Stan Zimmerman, it runs January 12 through February 24 at the Complex Dorie Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets visit www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3921444.

“Stockholm” Meet the couple every couple wants to be. Attractive and immaculately turned out, they are the perfect team. Tomorrow they will be in Stockholm, a city where, in summer, the sun shines 24/7 and sometimes it’s dark all day long. Today, it’s his birthday and she’s going to give him all his presents, treats and surprises. Treading a fine line between tenderness and cruelty, it reveals a relationship unravelling. It’s beautiful, but it’s not pretty. Written by Bryony Lavery, and directed by Kim Rubenstein, it runs January 12 through January 28 at the Pico Playhouse in West Los Angeles. For tickets visit www.stockholmla.brownpapertickets.com.

 

“Driving Miss Daisy” is about the decades-long relationship between a strong-willed, well-to-do Jewish woman and her black chauffeur, in the Jim Crow south. Set against a backdrop of changing world events between the late 1940s and early ‘70s, what begins as a troubled and hostile pairing soon blossoms into a profound, life-altering friendship that transcends all the societal boundaries placed between them. Written by Alfred Uhry, and directed by Michael Bloom, it runs January 13 through January 27 at the Laguna Playhouse in Laguna Beach. For tickets call 949-497-2787 or visit www.lagunaplayhouse.com.

“The Empty Nesters” hard working parents Greg and Frances stop for a visit to the Grand Canyon’s breathtaking Skywalk, a not-to-be missed sight, after delivering their final child to college in Phoenix. But, instead of seeing a limitless horizon full of fresh possibilities, one half of the couple faces an empty chasm, while the other begins to wonder if freedom is only a loss of solid footing. Written by Garret Jon Groenveld, and directed by Richard Seyd, it runs January 17 through February 17 at the Zephyr Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets visit www.EmptyNestersPlay.com.

“It Is Done” Hank’s Bar is a roadside joint on a desolate highway in the middle of nowhere. Hank the barkeep passes the time when he has no customers by perusing a porn mag while pleasuring himself. He likes the bar’s isolated location: It keeps him away from his ex-wife and kids. But Hank does have one customer this evening: Jonas, a drifter who wants to drink, not chat. Jonas has been haunted by troubling dreams. He travels from place to place to escape his past. Into the bar strides Ruby, a sexy woman who informs them that her car has broken down nearby. Can she use the phone to call the auto club? A howling dust storm outside suggests that the three are going to remain at the bar for a while. A mysterious traveler, a horny barkeep, a sensuous woman trapped in a dive bar with an abundant supply of bourbon. Anything could happen. Whatever happens, one thing is certain: There will be hell to pay. Written by Alex Goldberg, and directed by Jeff G. Rack, it runs January 17 through February 19 at the Theatre 40, in the Reuben Cordova Theatre in Beverly Hills. For tickets call 310-364-0535 or visit www.theatre40.org.

“Brilliant Traces” Rosannah Deluce has been driving for days. Her car dies in a snowbound corner of Alaska. In distress, she seeks shelter in the only nearby structure, an old barn that is the home of Henry Harry, a man she does not know. She is attired in a wedding gown. She is a runaway bride. Henry Harry is an oil rig worker who lives a hermit’s existence during the periods he is not working. His solitude is a refuge from the pain and trauma of events past. The last thing he wants is company, but a beautiful woman has landed literally at his doorstep. Both have run away from circumstances too difficult to endure. Over the next few days, alternately repulsed by and attracted to each other, they might discover that they are kindred spirits. Written by Cindy Lou Johnson, and directed by Kiff Scholl, it runs January 18 through February 10 at the Lounge Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets call 440-465-8878 or visit www.our.show/brillianttraces.

“Death House” On the night a death-house chaplain must hand over the reins to the confident young pastor set to replace him, the men encounter an enigmatic inmate who challenges their convictions and changes their lives forever. This is a startling new piece of theatre that explores justice, redemption, and the possibility that we’re all more connected than we may want to admit. Written by Jason Karasev, and directed by Michael Peretzian, it runs January 18 through March 10 at the Road on Lankershim in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-761-8838 or visit www.roadtheatre.org.

“Last Call” the Vaughn family’s go-to defense mechanism of sarcasm and mordant humor falls short when the aging parents hatch a not-so-funny way to avoid the retirement home. Written by Anne Kenney, and directed by Lane Allison, it runs January 18 through February 23 at the Atwater Village Theatre in Atwater. For tickets call 323-882-6912 or visit www.openfist.org.

“Nude/Naked” Pulitzer Prize winning photographer Bennett Duquesne and his daughter Addy have had their controversial work collected by major art museums all over the world. When Addy’s trust funder boyfriend shoots one of Duquesne’s students in their living room, photos meant to be viewed on art gallery walls or in coffee table books become plastered all over the Internet. The Duquesnes struggle to hold onto their unique, intuitive relationship while the local District Attorney pressures them to reveal more about their personal lives, and the mainstream and social media launch brutal attacks. Written and directed by Paul Hoan Zeidler, it runs January 18 through February 17 at the McCadden Place Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-204-4883.

“Aleichem Sholom” This new musical, performed in English with just a taste of Yiddish, follows the life of the beloved Yiddish story-teller and his mespoche, spinning tales of his loves and losses, his fame and his failures, his travels, his travails and the tremendous joy and optimism that kept him going against all odds. Written by Chris DeCarlo and Evelyn Rudie, with music by Ben Weisman, Emery Bernauer, Evelyn Rudie and Sholom Aleichem, and directed by Arthur R. Tompkins, it runs January 19 through February 24 at the Santa Monica Playhouse in Santa Monica. For tickets call 310-394-9779 Ext. 1 or visit www.santamonicaplayhouse.com/aleichem-sholom.html.

“Hir” is a dysfunctional family dramedy for a new era: a highly intelligent, heartfelt and deeply, darkly humorous portrayal of a family in crisis, in which domestic abuse, the trauma of war and the acceptance of gender neutrality are illustrated in a nearly absurd, emotionally gripping, intensely real dynamic. Somewhere in the American suburbs, Isaac, dishonorably discharged from his tour in Afghanistan, has returned home to discover a household in revolt. The insurgent: his mom. Liberated from an oppressive marriage to Isaac’s father by his debilitating stroke, and with Max, Isaac’s newly out transgender sibling, as her ally, Paige is on a crusade to dismantle the patriarchy. Written by Taylor Mac, and directed by Bart DeLorenzo, it runs January 19 through March 17 at the Odyssey Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-477-2055 Ext. 2 or visit www.OdysseyTheatre.com.

“The Marriage Zone” Cal and Beth are selling their home. They’re visited by Skip and Ellie, an engaged couple, very much in love who are eager to buy their first home. They’re joined by Mike and Liz, apparently a couple of lookie-loos who decided to drop by and take a peek at the house for sale. The three couples get to chatting and begin to marvel at just how much they have in common. WAY too much in common, in fact. So much in common that it begins to become surreal. Written and directed by Jeff Gould, it runs January 19 through March 31 at the Santa Monica Playhouse in Santa Monica. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3919605.

“Red Hot Mama – the Sophie Tucker Songbook” chronicles the life and career of the first lady of show business, whose remarkable career spanned six decades. Sophie Tucker was a consummate performer on stage screen and radio, was part of the Ziegfield Follies early in her career, and in addition to her legendary artistry, was a great humanitarian. Featuring the music and history of burlesque, vaudeville, Broadway and Las Vegas, the show features over two dozen songs made famous by Tucker including compositions by Cole Porter, Irving Berlin, George and Ira Gershwin, and DeSylva & Brown. Written by Sharon McNight, and directed by Richard Riccardi, it runs January 19 through January 20 at the Rubicon Theatre Company in Ventura. For tickets call 805-667-2900 or visit www.rubicontheatre.org.

“Sweeney Todd: The Demon Barber of Fleet Street” follows Sweeney Todd as he settles into a barber shop, above Mrs. Lovett’s struggling pie shop, and plots revenge on the lecherous judge who wronged Todd and his family. The barber’s strange alliance with the pie-maker seems to provide the perfect solution to their problems. The themes in Sweeney—power, abuse of power, revenge and responsibility—continue to resonate with 21st-century audiences. Written by Stephen Sondheim, with music by Stephen Sondheim, and directed by Kent Nicholson, it runs January 19 through February 16 at the Segerstrom Stage at South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. For tickets call 714-708-5555 or visit www.scr.org.

“Rod Serling’s Stories from the Zone” consists of stage adaptations of two classic episodes of his best-loved TV series. Mr. Garrity and the Graves: In the Old West circa 1890, a man and his wagon find their way into the town of Happiness, Arizona. The man, Garrity, claims to have the ability to resurrect the dead. Some of the townspeople figure that resurrecting the folks planted on Boot Hill might not be the best idea. Will the Real Martian Please Stand Up?: Passengers of a snow-bound bus originally bound for Boston are stranded at a roadside diner. There’s a growing realization that one of their number might actually be an invader from Mars. Written by Rod Serling, adapted by Jeff G. Rack, and directed by Jeff G. Rack and Charlie Mount, it runs January 21 through February 17 at the Theatre Forty, in the Reuben Cordova Theatre in Beverly Hills. For tickets call 310-364-0535 or visit www.theatre40.org.

“An Inspector Calls” set in 1912, about Inspector Goole and his unexpected arrival at the prosperous Birling family home, shattering their peaceful dinner party by his investigations into the death of a young woman. His startling revelations shake the very foundations of their lives and challenge audiences to question their own consciences. Written by J.B. Priestley, and directed by Stephen Daldry, it runs January 22 through February 10 at the Wallis Annenberg Center for Performing Arts in Beverly Hills. For tickets call 310-746-4000 or visit www.TheWallis.org/Inspector.

“Well” is a hilarious, moving story that combines the genres of solo performance and experimental theatre with the timeless story of mothers and daughters. Written by Lisa Kron, and directed by Bradley Griffin, it runs January 22 through January 25 at the Lindhurst Theatre, Pepperdine University in Malibu. For tickets call 310-506-4522 or visit www.arts.pepperdine.edu.

“The Cripple of Inishmaan” is set on the small Aran Island community of Inishmaan (Inis Meáin) off the Western Coast of Ireland in 1934, where the inhabitants are excited to learn of a Hollywood film crew’s arrival in neighboring Inishmore (Inis Mór) to make a documentary about life on the islands. “Cripple” Billy Claven, eager to escape the gossip, poverty and boredom of Inishmaan, vies for a part in the film, and to everyone’s surprise, the orphan and outcast gets his chance… or so some believe. Antaeus Theatre Company presents a fully partner-cast production, presenting two equally excellent but very different sets of actors at alternating performances. Written by Martin McDonagh, and directed by Steven Robman, it runs January 24 through March 11 at the Kiki & David Gindler Performing Arts Center in Glendale. For tickets call 818-506-1983 or visit www.Antaeus.org.

“Laundry and Bourbon and Lone Star” is two one-act plays where three young women who are neighbors and friends share drinks and hard truths about life, love, and marriage while doing laundry on a very hot day. In another part of town three men beat-the-heat in the backyard of a bar as the local high school hero, recently returned after a hitch in Vietnam, details his military and amorous exploits. Laughs are shared, souls are bared. Written by James McLure, and directed by Barbara Brownell, it runs January 25 through March 3 at the Lonny Chapman Theatre in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-763-5990 or visit www.thegrouprep.com.

“Link Link Circus” is a comedic and scientifically informed look at the links between humans and animals, via Darwin’s theory of evolution. Rossellini is a vivid monologist exploring the brilliance of the animal kingdom. The show is illustrated with her short comic films, home movies, and animation. Rossellini transforms herself into Aristotle, Descartes, a medieval theologian, B.F. Skinner, Charles Darwin and other helpful thinkers of the past, while her dog Pan plays various animals, assisted by puppeteer and animal handler Schuyler Beeman. Written by Isabella Rossellini and Guido Torlonia, with music by Andy Byers, and directed by Isabella Rossellini, it runs January 25 through January 27 at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica. For tickets call 310-434-3200 or visit www.thebroadstage.org.

“Paradise” Two outsiders, a gifted Yemeni-American teenager at a poorly rated high school in the South Bronx and her disillusioned biology teacher, form an unlikely scientific partnership in the hope of securing her a scholarship. But when conflicts arise over differences in religion, culture and the boundaries of mentorship, their capacity to alter the course of each other’s lives becomes greater than either had imagined. Written by Laura Maria Censabella, and directed by Vicangelo Bulluck, it runs January 26 through February 17 at the Odyssey Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-960-7724 or visit www.Plays411.com/Paradise.

“The P.O.W. and the Girl” It’s the 1980s in Britain. Sarah, a college student, lives with her grandfather, John (Johnny) Harris, after the sudden death of her mother. John was a prisoner of war in a Japanese prison camp during World War II. Several decades later, he openly manifests classic symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, including flashbacks and petty to explosive outbursts directed at his granddaughter. This in turn, has a negative impact on Sarah’s well-being. Meanwhile, Sarah meets a sweet, sincere young man named Paul and a budding romance ensues. When she discovers that Paul’s life also is far from perfect, it emerges that she may have found a kindred spirit in Paul. Torn between familial duty and a chance at love and happiness, can Sarah’s new relationship with Paul survive? Can John ever overcome the traumas of incarceration, torture and abandonment? Written by Katrina Wood, and directed by Trace Oakley, it runs January 26 through February 16 at the Sherry Theatre in North Hollywood. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3742908.

“Forever Motown” is an incredible collection of nine all-star performers including the Spinners original lead singer G.C. Cameron and former Temptations Lead Singer Glenn Leonard, along with members of The Marvelettes and a live band singing your favorite hit songs from all the Motown legends including The Four Tops, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, The Supremes, Smoky Robinson and more. Directed by Terri Giordano, it runs January 30 through February 2 at the Laguna Playhouse in Laguna Beach. For tickets call 949-497-2787 or visit www.lagunaplayhouse.com.

“S.O.S.” explores how political opportunists and economic systems have fed off and taken advantage of a rise in our sense of personal isolation and how we might find a way back to belonging to each other and the world we inhabit. Written by various famous writers, and directed by Madeleine Dahm, it runs January 31 through February 10 at the Circle X Theatre in Atwater Village. For tickets call 310-746-4000 or visit www.TheWallis.org/SOS.

Enjoy life more – see a show tonight!

 

“Scene in LA” December 2018 by Steve Zall and Sid Fish

Here are some of the shows you can see in our local theaters this month:

“All About Santa” It’s holiday time at the North Pole and everyone is in a tizzy – Santa has disappeared. Is he taking a vacation? Did the sleigh run out of spirits? Can Mrs. Claus keep the home fires burning and the toyshop churning until he can be found? And to make matters worse, who should appear on the scene but the Suits – the Mad Men from Badison Avenue – ready and willing to “solve” the problem with a host of plans to make the holidays even more commercial than ever. The good North Pole folk in this heart-warming Victorian yuletide musical almost succumb to these sinister hijinks, but, with the help of the audience, love and good cheer conquers all, leaving the way clear for still another happy holiday season! Written and directed by Evelyn Rudie and Chris DeCarlo, with music by Evelyn Rudie and Matthew Wrather, it runs December 1 through December 16 at the Other Space at Santa Monica Playhouse in Santa Monica. For tickets call 310-394-9779 Ext. 2 or visit www.SantaMonicaPlayhouse.com.

“A Christmas Carol” allows families to once again take a supremely theatrical journey and celebrate the transformative power of forgiveness during the holidays. Ebenezer Scrooge’s rebirth from miserly curmudgeon to the epitome of love and generosity affirms our faith in the potent goodness of humanity during this beloved time of year. Written by Charles Dickens, adapted by Geoff Elliott, and directed by Geoff Elliott and Julia Rodriguez-Elliott, it runs December 1 through December 23 at the A Noise Within in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-356-3121 or visit www.anoisewithin.org.

“A Harmony Boys Christmas: Live from Waikiki Beach” The Boys are back! It’s 1963 all over again and famed foursome The Harmony Boys are returning to spread Christmas Cheer all over your face in a new holiday special on the gay and vibrant shores of beautiful Waikiki Beach! See Billy, Bobby, Barry, and Xian Ling Moon Harmony reunite onstage together in this singing, dancing, toe-tapping yuletide extravaganza. For mature audiences. Written by Aaron Matijasic, with music by Ben Stanton, and directed by Jaime Robledo, it runs December 1 through December 23 at the Broadwater Main Stage in Hollywood. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.theharmonyboys.brownpapertickets.com.

“Sugar Plum Fairy” tells the story of a 12 year-old girl who dreams of dancing the lead in The Nutcracker. Audiences are encouraged to come decked out in ugly holiday sweaters, tutus, and Hanukah hats and be prepared to join in the 75 minutes of madcap merriment. Written by Sandra Tsing Loh, and directed by Bart De Lorenzo, it runs December 1 through December 23 at the Skylight Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 213-761-7061 or visit www.SkylightTix.org.

“A Holiday Comedy Sh*tSH*W” Brace yourself for an evening of hysterical proportion with “Finding the Virgin Mary’s Baby Daddy, Subway Dwelling Jesus, The Flawed Logic of the Male Mind, Just the “10%.” Tips…all topics you are bound to encounter during the holidays. Okay, maybe not so much, but you most definitely will at this production. Directed by Jackie Learmond and Megan James, it runs December 4 through December 12 at the Complex Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets visit www.squareup.com/store/holiday-comedy-shitsh-star-w.

“Love Actually Live” takes place in a three-dimensional world where scenery and video screens intertwine, providing a canvas upon which actors weave between projections as they bring unforgettable scenes to life through the movie’s album. The film, along with original custom-video content illustrating the London-based setting, is displayed on screens that travel throughout the stage, immersing the singers and musicians in a cinematic spectacle. This theatrical world transforms the experience so completely that audiences will fall in love with Love Actually all over again. The production, a one-of-a-kind presentation is performed live by an all-star cast and 15-piece orchestra includes songs from the hit film, including “Christmas Is All Around,” “The Trouble with Love Is,” and “Both Sides Now.” Written by Richard Curtis, with music by Jesse Vargas, and directed by Anderson Davis, it runs December 4 through December 31 at the Wallis Annenberg Center for Performing Arts in Beverly Hills. For tickets call 310-746-4000 or visit www.thewallis.org/love.

“Bob’s Holiday Office Party” Every year, insurance agent Bob Finhead’s whacked out friends and clients stop by his small-town Iowa office for their annual holiday bash. The town mayor, the sheriff, the twin farmer sisters, the stoner, the town floozy and the pastor’s wife have already RSVP’d for this year’s event. But Bob has dreams of a bigger life and wants to escape their narrow-minded thinking. Will he be able to fulfill his dream of becoming a professional inventor and move to the big city, or will he come to realize how much he is the heart and soul of the town? Will any of this matter once the party starts, the bickering and fighting begins, and the drinks hit the floor? Written by Joe Keyes and Rob Elk, and directed by Matt Roth, it runs December 6 through December 20 at the Atwater Village Theatre in Atwater. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.bobs23.brownpapertickets.com.

“A Christmas Carol with Charles Dickens” David Melville gives a virtuoso performance as nearly all the characters in the story. He is joined by Kalean Ung who provides dramatic interjections, sound effects and live music. Written by Charles Dickens, with music by Kalean Ung, and directed by Melissa Chalsma, it runs December 6 through December 23 at the Independent Studio in the Atwater Crossing Arts + Innovation Complex in Atwater Village. For tickets call 818-710-6306 or visit www.iscla.org.

“The Eight: Reindeer Monologues” Listen to the eight reindeer dishing about the real Santa in some serious X-rated fashion! All those rumors you’ve heard about him and the elves? About Rudolph’s little secret? About Vixen’s story that was leaked to the press? All true. Yes, the reindeer finally speak up and – believe us – they do not hold back! Written by Jeff Goode, and directed by Bill Reilly, it runs December 6 through December 23 at the Crown City Theatre Company in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-605-5685 or visit www.crowncitytheatre.com.

“Beauty and the Beast – A Christmas Rose” In this interactive experience, the audience is encouraged to CHEER for Belle, BOO for Gus and sing along with popular songs such as the Bee Gees’ “Staying Alive,” The Chainsmokers & Coldplay’s “Something Just Like This,” and Edith Piaf’s “La Vie En Rose.” Written by Kris Lythgoe, with music by Keith Harrison, and directed by Sheldon Epps, it runs December 8 through December 30 at the Laguna Playhouse in Laguna Beach. For tickets call 949-497-2787 or visit www.lagunaplayhouse.com.

“It’s a Wonderful Life: The Radio Play” takes place at KAWL, a struggling 1940s radio station that good-hearted owner Michael Anderson is barely keeping alive. He calls on some old friends (with big personalities) and some less-than-professional station employees to offer up a live radio version of Frank Capra’s touching masterpiece It’s a Wonderful Life in what might sadly be the station’s last live show. But it’s the holidays, a time when miracles can happen…. Written by Jim Martyka, and directed by Carey Matthews, it runs December 8 through December 16 at the Belfry Stage Upstairs at the Crown in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-849-4039 or visit www.theatreunleashed.org.

“South Pacific” the musical is set on an exotic island during World War II. The plot follows two love stories about seeming-opposites brought together by the circumstances of war and torn apart by prejudice and fear. In the core story, Nellie Forbush, a naïve American nurse from a small town, falls in love with Emile de Becque, a sophisticated French plantation owner with a mysterious past. In the second, Joe Cable, a Marine Lieutenant from Philadelphia finds himself drawn to Liat, a young native girl. The timeless score includes beautiful ballads such as “Younger the Springtime” and “Some Enchanted Evening,” exuberant up-tempo songs like “I’m in Love with a Wonderful Guy,” comic character numbers like “There Is Nothing Like a Dame,” and driving anthems like the ever-timely “You’ve Got to Be Carefully Taught.” Written by Oscar Hammerstein II and Joshua Logan, with music by Richard Rodgers, lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, and directed by Katharine Farmer, it runs December 8 through December 23 at the Rubicon Theatre in Ventura. For tickets call 805-667-2900 or visit www.rubicontheatre.org.

“Wink” Wink, a homeless gender questioning teenager and Dario Villanova, a former A-list actor who is now doing B movies, are both down on their luck in Los Angeles. When a synchronistic meeting connects these two souls, they quickly bond over music, art, and life’s unexpected misfortunes. Sometimes the best way forward is to stop fighting the past. Written by Neil Koenigsberg, and directed by Michael Allen Angel, it runs December 8 through January 13 at the Zephyr on Melrose in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-960-1055 or visit www.plays411.com/newsite/show/play_info.asp?show_id=4855.

“The Year without a Santana Claus” Santa’s gonna need a BLACK MAGIC WOMAN this year ‘cause he’s real sick with a CORAZON ESPINADO. Poor Santa feels like he has NO ONE TO DEPEND ON and to make matters worse THIS BOY’S FIRE is comin’ in at a fever of 102. It’s no wonder – the ol’ guy can’t be EVERYBODY’S EVERYTHING!!! One thing’s for certain – Santa’s in need of a serious vacay. Maybe he’ll vacation on Mars and attend an INTERPLANETARY PARTY? Or maybe he’ll play it SMOOTH and lay low down south in Cabo. Will the Heatmiser tell his brother the Snowmiser to change his EVIL WAYS? Will Santa say “Hey, Mrs. Claus WHY DON’T YOU AND I get together and take a snowboarding lesson?” Will the Troubies come to the rescue and save Christmas? This holiday season bring the familia to the El Portal and party and laugh INTO THE NIGHT!!! The Troubies’ annual holiday show has become a tradition in Los Angeles. Written and directed by Matt Walker, it runs December 8 through December 30 at the El Portal Theatre Debbie Reynolds Mainstage in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-508-4200 or visit www.elportaltheatre.com.

“It’s a Wonderful Life: A Live Radio Play” One of the all-time classic Christmas stories comes to life onstage in a 1940s-style radio broadcast – join George Bailey, a down-on-his-luck man, as his guardian angel shows him what his town would have been like had he never been born. This timeless masterpiece guarantees to warm your heart this holiday season. Written by Joe Landry, and directed by Cameron Watson, it runs December 12 through December 23 at the Pasadena Playhouse in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-356-7529 or visit www.pasadenaplayhouse.org.

“Jane Austen UnScripted” gives audiences a chance to imagine the other books she might have written. The company starts with audience suggestions and deftly creates a world of love-struck girls, brooding noblemen and charming cads, and although hearts are sure to be broken, true love will win out in the end. Written by Impro Theatre Company, it runs December 14 through December 22 at the Broad Stage in Santa Monica. For tickets call 310-434-3200 or visit www.thebroadstage.org.

“Special” commemorates the 40th Anniversary of the worst variety show in television history with a behind-the-scenes imagined look of how The Star Wars Holiday Special came to be. How could it miss? It was riding the coattails of what was at that point the most popular movie of all time. It featured appearances by cast members, including Harrison Ford and Carrie Fisher. It had great guest stars like Bea Arthur, Harvey Korman, Art Carney and (in holographic form) Jefferson Starship and Diahann Carroll. There was even a cartoon sequence (the first appearance of Boba Fett). The narrative involved the celebration of the Wookiee holiday Life Day (because there’s no Christmas in Space), as Chewie’s family wants to celebrate despite the intrusion of Imperial Storm Troopers. What could possibly go wrong? Everything. The Love Boat pulled better Nielsen numbers than The Star Wars Holiday Special. CBS never aired it again. Written by Andrew Osborne, and directed by Kerr Lordygan, it runs December 14 through December 31 at the Theatre of NOTE in Hollywood. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.specialtheplay.com/tickets.

 

“The Nutcracker” The Long Beach Ballet has pulled out all the stops for this 36th production of the classical tale. This production boasts a full symphony orchestra, a flying sleigh, a real live horse, on-stage pyrotechnics, and a cast of over 200. Former Disney designers Elliot Hessayon and Scott Schaffer created the enchanting scenery, Australian artist Adrian Clark designed the detailed costumes, and renowned magician Franz Harary created the special effects, including a magical costume switch, involving Clara instantly changing from her nightgown into a gleaming ball gown. Written by E. T. A. Hoffmann, with music by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, and directed by David Wilcox, it runs December 15 through December 23 at the Terrace Theater at the Long Beach Convention & Entertainment Center in Long Beach. For tickets call 877-852-3177 or visit www.longbeachballet.com.

“The Wonderful Winter of Oz” On Christmas Eve, Dorothy gets swept away by a ‘freak’ Kansas blizzard and lands in a world of munchkins and witches. An updated version of the beloved classic, in the style of a traditional British family Panto, THE WONDERFUL WINTER OF OZ features family-friendly magic, with a comedic twist, dancing (with “So You Think You Can Dance” alumni), contemporary music and more. Written by Kris Lythgoe, with music by Michael Orland, and directed by Bonnie Lythgoe, it runs December 15 through December 30 at the Pasadena Civic Auditorium in Pasadena. For tickets call 800-982-2787 or visit www.thepasadenacivic.com.

 

Enjoy life more – see a show tonight!

“Scene in LA” November 2018 by Steve Zall and Sid Fish

Here are some of the shows you can see in our local theaters this month:

“Cleo, Theo & Wu” Lucy is a modern Angeleno gal just trying to be her best self. The Cool Girl, Lady Boss and all around getting sh*t done Boss Bitch. But, suddenly, the fate of the universe is in her hands and she’s gonna need to do better than self-help books and inspirational Insta-quotes. Never fear, space creatures from the future and the forgotten women of ancient history are teaming up to get Lucy on the right track. Careening through time and place, it takes Lucy on a heroine’s journey with the remarkable women who were so much more than the power hungry, sex-obsessed obstacles that history books would have you believe. Written by Kirsten Vangsness, and directed by Lisa Dring, it runs November 1 through December 8 at the Theatre of NOTE in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-856-8611 or www.theatreofnote.com.

“SIGNing the Song” Through American Sign Language paired with singing, William Martinez shares the true story of a boy who grew up in a deaf household with little exposure to TV, radio, or movies. Because of his incredible 8th grade music teacher and the love and support of his parents, he came out of his silent world and discovered his voice through music. ASL (American Sign Language) and song lyrics meld together into a beautiful unique art form. This immersive one-man show celebrates the extraordinary impact educators and parents have on each child’s life … regardless of their struggles. Written and directed by William Martinez, with music by David Bawiec, it runs November 1 through November 4 at the Colony Theatre in Burbank. For tickets call 866-811-4111 or visit www.colonytheatre.org.

“Parfumerie” feuding employees George Horvath and Amalia Balash have each fallen in love with their secret pen pal. What will happen on Christmas Eve when they discover their true lover’s identity? Written by E. P. Dowdall, and directed by Brandon Ferruccio, it runs November 2 through December 9 at the Theatre Palisades in Pacific Palisades. For tickets call 310-454-1970 or visit www.theatrepalisades.com.

“She Loves Me” tells the beloved story of two feuding shop clerks who are unaware that they are the recipients of each other’s love letters. Written by Joe Masteroff, with music by Jerry Bock, lyrics by Sheldon Harnick, and directed by Cate Caplin, it runs November 2 through December 16 at the Actors Co-op David Schall Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-462-8460 or visit www.ActorsCo-op.org.

“Bliss (or Emily Post is Dead)” It’s 1960 and America is in the midst of a civil upheaval. But in North Orange, NJ, an immaculate suburb with all the trappings of a prosperous, modern society: afternoon tea parties, electronic appliances, and JELL-O! “Progress and Science” are the buzzwords of the day. In this farcical, domestic tragicomedy, the classical Greek heroines, Clytemnestra and Medea, have been recast as pill-popping housewives, and Antigone is the lovelorn, teenage girl next door. Their “blissful” lives are upended when Cassandra, a colored girl new to town and cursed with the gift of prophecy, arrives with a mind to free them from their dark destinies. Written by Jami Brandli, and directed by Darin Anthony, it runs November 3 through December 2 at the Atwater Village Theatre in Atwater. For tickets call 323-472-5646 or visit www.movingarts.org.

“A Mile in My Shoes” we meet Ester, an omniscient “shoe whisperer,” as she walks us through a day in her life on Skid Row. We meet a variety of characters: a transgender teen, a young mom, a mentally ill substance abuser, a high school valedictorian, a police officer, concerned citizens at a city council meeting and others as they put a face on the homeless epidemic. Written by Kathryn Taylor Smith, and directed by Zadia Ife, it runs November 4 through December 9 at the Hudson Backstage Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets visit www.plays411.com/mileinmyshoes.

“Charles Dickens’ A Christmas Carol” Tony Award winner Jefferson Mays breathes new life into the greatest ghost story ever told. While the heart of A Christmas Carol is evergreen, Mays brings fresh perspective to Scrooge, Bob Cratchit, Tiny Tim and the rest, playing every role in this whirlwind one-man show. Written by Charles Dickens, adapted by Jefferson Mays, Susan Lyons and Michael Arden, and directed by Michael Arden, it runs November 7 through December 2 at the Gil Cates Theater at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-208-5454 or visit www.geffenplayhouse.org.

“Anatomy of a Hug” Amelia has a job selling memberships to a charity that rescues kids in countries overseas. She’s invested the rest of her life in her beloved television shows, which provide her an emotional haven. Sonia is Amelia’s mother. She’s been given Compassionate Release from prison as she is terminally ill. She was convicted of murdering Amelia’s father. She’s moved into Amelia’s apartment with the aid of a social worker, Iris. Amelia has attracted the attention of a decent, sincere co-worker named Ben, who introduces her to a wonderful human invention called a hug. Can Amelia possibly bridge the emotional chasm with her mother while there’s still time? Will the wounds of the past prevent Amelia from returning Ben’s affection? Written by Kat Ramsburg, and directed by Steve Jarrard, it runs November 9 through December 2 at the Sherry Theatre in North Hollywood. For tickets call 323-860-6569 or visit www.anatomyofahug.bpt.me.

“Blacktop Highway” Renowned performer John Fleck reinvents the gothic horror genre in this horrifyingly hysterical tale of taxidermy, transformation and caged creatures. Fleck continues to break new ground playing all the parts (both human and animal) in this brilliantly staged screenplay. Written by John Fleck, and directed by Randee Trabitz, it runs November 9 through December 15 at the Odyssey Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-477-2055 Ext. 2 or visit www.OdysseyTheatre.com.

 

“The Color Purple” is an inspiring family saga that tells the unforgettable story of a woman who, through love, finds the strength to triumph over adversity and discover her unique voice in the world. The story spotlights Celie, a downtrodden young woman whose personal awakening over the course of 40 years forms the arc of this epic story. With a joyous score featuring jazz, ragtime, gospel, African music and blues, it is a story of hope, a testament to the healing power of love and a celebration of life. Written by Alice Walker, book by Marsha Norman, with music by Brenda Russell, Allee Willis and Stephen Bray, and directed by Jeffrey Polk, it runs November 9 through December 9 at the Greenway Court Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-673-0544 or visit www.GreenwayCourtTheatre.org/THECOLORPURPLE.

“Confederates” is an often funny, often devastating look at today’s high stakes political media landscape. When two journalists embedded with the campaign of a newly declared presidential campaign — one seasoned, the other young and ambitious — uncover a compromising photo of the candidate’s daughter, they must decide whether to publish or bury it. Written by Suzanne Bradbeer, and directed by Christopher Hart, it runs November 9 through December 16 at the Grove Theater Center in Burbank. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.hartnpi.org/tickets.

“Curtains” It’s the brassy, bright, and promising year of 1959. Boston’s Colonial Theatre is hosting the opening-night performance of a new musical. When the leading lady mysteriously dies on stage, the entire cast and crew are suspects. Enter a local detective, who just happens to be a musical-theatre fan! Curtains is the final musical from the American musical theatre composing giants Kander and Ebb, who brought us such works as Cabaret, Chicago, and Kiss of the Spider Woman. Written by Rupert Holmes, with music by John Kander, lyrics by Fred Ebb, and directed by Tony Cason, it runs November 9 through November 17 at the Smothers Theatre Pepperdine University in Malibu. For tickets call 310-506-4522 or visit www.arts.pepperdine.edu.

 

“Death and Cockroaches” Meet Eric. He’s an aspiring playwright who’s trying to break into TV writing when his Dad interrupts his plans by suddenly getting sick with a terminal illness. Instead of stepping up to his familial duties, Eric runs away from his sadness straight into a ‘Wall of Dicks’. Fortunately, there’s a hot, imaginary Cockroach who’s there to help him to confront his grief and his family’s disappointment. Written by Eric Reyes Loo, and directed by Jennifer Chang, it runs November 9 through December 1 at the Atwater Village Theatre in Atwater. For tickets call 323-379-9583 or visit www.chalkrep.com.

“Disney’s the Little Mermaid” is a hauntingly beautiful love story for the ages. This fishy fable will capture your heart with its irresistible songs, including “Under the Sea”, “Kiss the Girl” and “Part of Your World”. Ariel, King Triton’s youngest daughter, wishes to pursue the human Prince Eric in the world above, bargaining with the evil sea witch, Ursula, to trade her tail for legs. But the bargain is not what it seems, and Ariel needs the help of her colorful friends, Flounder the fish, Scuttle the seagull and Sebastian the crab to restore order under the sea. Written by Doug Wright, based on the Hans Christian Andersen story, with music by Alan Menken, lyrics by Howard Ashman and Glenn Slater, and directed by Catherine Rahm, it runs November 9 through December 15 at the Westchester Playhouse in Westchester. For tickets call 310-645-5156 or visit www.kentwoodplayers.org.

 

“In a Booth at Chasen’s” In November 1949, a nervous 29 year-old starlet – Nancy Davis – went to a dinner at Chasen’s restaurant with the President – of the Screen Actors Guild – movie star Ronald Reagan, while Reagan is still nursing a broken heart from his divorce from Jane Wyman. There is an attraction, and the two hit it off. Several weeks later, the two have become closer, but not yet exclusive. Nancy helps Ron paint the fences at his ranch in the San Fernando Valley, and starts to get to know his children. She even loves his dumb jokes. Over the next two years, the couple confide in one another, turn up the heat, bicker and rage against the gossipy tabloid press, and even battle the threat of Communism. The drama is in how Nancy plays hard to get, and how long it takes Ron to propose. The marriage of Ron and Nancy Reagan continues to be written about, talked about, analyzed and scrutinized. To some, Ron’s unyielding devotion to his wife is to be admired and Nancy’s fierce protection of her husband is applauded. To others, their relationship seemed odd, old-fashioned and even corny. Either way, it cannot be denied that few, if any, marriages had more of an impact on the 20th century. Written by Sam Bennett, with music by Al Kasha and Phil Swann, and directed by Kay Cole, it runs November 9 through November 25 at the El Portal Theatre Debbie Reynolds Mainstage in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-508-4200 or visit www.elportal.com.

“Remembering Boyle Heights” Contemporary gentrification debates unlock the early history, stories and memories of Boyle Heights revealing the mythical and human dimensions of L.A.’s own Ellis Island of the West. Written by Josefina López and Corky Dominguez, and directed by Corky Dominguez, it runs November 9 through December 16 at the CASA 0101 Theater in Boyle Heights. For tickets call 323-263-7684 or visit www.casa0101.org.

“The Value of Moscow” Three grown “adult” sisters are thrust back into living together as a last resort after their various lives have fallen apart. This trio can’t even agree on how to unpack their stuff much less their relationships and pasts. And before they can finish the bottle of vodka they found in the kitchen, everything goes from bad to worse, to a lot, LOT worse. Can they set aside their grievances long enough to work together and save themselves? Probably not. But with acerbic wit and an encounter with the pizza man, these three sisters aim to find out. Written by Amy Dellagiarino, and directed by Carrie Keranen, it runs November 9 through December 8 at the Second Stage at The Broadwater Theater Complex in Los Angeles. For tickets visit www.sacredfools.org.

“My Date With Death – A Musical Romance” Link finds himself at the end of his rope, drinking the remainder of his life away at a bar when he is visited by a Spirit from the beyond. This Spirit reveals herself to be a Soul Collector sent to keep Link from ending his energy too soon. Strap in and take a Dickensian sprint across the universe with Link, an isolated soul, as he falls in love with Lady Death, and her never-ending knowledge of the cosmos. Written by Daniel Sugimoto, with music by Daniel Sugimoto, and directed by Julia Lisa, it runs November 10 through December 2 at the Miles Memorial Playhouse in Santa Monica. For tickets call 323-301-9002 or visit www.thezootheatreco.com.

“Hughie” and “Krapp’s Last Tape” Reprising roles that have garnered critical and popular acclaim, Dennehy brings searing humanity and his extraordinary dramatic skill to these powerful productions:

Hughie: When high-rolling gambler and small-time hustler Erie Smith loses his confidant Hughie, his life takes a turn for the worse. In his grief, Erie befriends a new hotel night clerk and sees a chance for a winning streak.

Krapp’s Last Tape: Preparing for his birthday ritual, Krapp stumbles upon a recording of a tender memory from a lifetime ago. As he immerses himself in his own personal history, Krapp questions whether his present lives up to his past.

Written by Eugene O’Neill (Hughie), Samuel Beckett (Krapp’s Last Tape), and directed by Steven Robman, it runs November 14 through December 16 at the Audrey Skirball Kenis Theater at the Geffen Playhouse in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-208-5454 or visit www.geffenplayhouse.org.

“Bus Stop” tells a story of a group of people thrown together by a blizzard to spend a long night snowbound at a diner/bus stop in rural Kansas. It is especially the story of Bo, a young cowboy who has grown up on an isolated ranch in Montana. The wild young man has fallen for a nightclub chanteuse named Cherie while competing in a rodeo in Kansas City. He will need to be taught a lesson in humility and lose a fight before he can win the heart of the love of his life in what has become a classic American romance. The other characters all have their own agendas, too, including the diner’s two waitresses, the bus driver, the local sheriff, an itinerant educator, and Virgil, Bo’s ranch foreman and mentor. Written by William Inge, and directed by Ann Hearn Tobolowsky, it runs November 15 through December 16 at the Theatre 40, in the Reuben Cordova Theatre in Beverly Hills. For tickets call 310-364-0535 or visit www.theatre40.org.

“Chico’s Angels Five-O: Waikiki Chicas” This is one hurricane of a case! Hula dancers have gone missing from Waikiki’s hottest night club The Hula Ho. This is job for the three sexiest detectives alive, but since Sabrina, Jill and Kelly are busy, Chico’s Angels will take it! Come to paradise with Kay Sedia, Frieda Laye and Chita Parol as they go undercover in grass skirts, coconut bikinis and cha-cha pumps to solve the case of the missing Hula Hos. Chico’s Angels are three beautiful and comedic Latina drag queens as the leads: Kay Sedia, Chita Parol & Frieda Laye – Who work for pennies for their unseen boss. Think of the 70s series, Charlie’s Angels starring a Latino Three Stooges in drag. Written by Oscar Quintero and Kurt Koehler, and directed by Kurt Koehler, it runs November 15 through November 18 at the Colony Theater in Burbank. For tickets call 818-558-7000 or visit www.web.ovationtix.com/trs/pr/993027.

“A Carol Christmas” Instead of a man named Scrooge we have a woman named Carol, the successful, demanding host of a home-shopping show who cares nothing for Christmas and wants her staff to work right through the holidays. 17 new songs and all of the characters you know and love. Written by Doug Haverty, with music by Bruce Kimmel, and directed by Bruce Kimmel, it runs November 16 through December 30 at the Lonny Chapman Theatre in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-763-5990 or visit www.thegrouprep.com.

“Exit Wounds” explores the effects of a national tragedy on three generations of the perpetrator’s family. How do you find redemption when someone you love has committed a terrible crime? A story of healing, hope and compassion, Exit Wounds unravels slowly, as a mystery: what was the tragic event that caused hoarder Linda Sadowski to retreat from life, and her son, Matt to become estranged? How can Linda stem the ripple effect of the family’s painful past and save the 17-year-old grandson she’s never met? Written by Wendy Graf, and directed by Christopher Hart, it runs November 16 through December 15 at the Grove Theater Center in Burbank. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.hartnpi.org/tickets.

“Down to My Last Egg” When Remy’s window to become a mother started to close, she hit the road in search of a sperm daddy. Once she found him, getting pregnant proved to be even more slippery than his sperm. Her thoughts, ideas and actions around motherhood, and what it entails, left her with one question – Is she meant to be a mother? Did she conceive or did her last egg shrivel up and die? You’ll have to see the show to find out. Written by Remy O’Brien, and directed by Jonathan Medina, it runs November 18 through November 26 at the Theatre 40, in the Reuben Cordova Theatre in Beverly Hills. For tickets call 310-364-3606 or visit www.theatre40.org.

“A Christmas Story” The Parker family gets its Christmas tree. Ralphie’s dad, The Old Man, wins a very special prize in a contest. Ralphie is pursued by a girl in his class. Ralphie is pursued by the class bully. And, most famously, Ralphie sets off on a campaign to acquire his most-desired Christmas present, a Red Ryder BB air rifle, only to be warned repeatedly, “You’ll put your eye out, kid”. Written by Philip Grecian, based on the screenplay by Jean Shepherd, Leigh Brown and Bob Clark, and also on the book In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash, and directed by Christian Lebano, it runs November 23 through December 30 at the Sierra Madre Playhouse in Sierra Madre. For tickets call 626-355-4318 or visit www.sierramadreplayhouse.org.

“Bob Baker’s Nutcracker” features over 100 handcrafted puppets to take the entire family on an adventure through the wizardry of strings and into the enchanted world of the fantastic. Bob Baker’s adaptation of the ballet classic is one of Bob Baker Marionette Theater’s most beloved shows since it began in 1969. The Sugar Plum Fairy and her promenading cakes, waltzing flowers, and all of the wonders beyond the mysterious door are now to be found at the Carrie Hamilton Theatre — entirely outfitted for the holidays — at Pasadena Playhouse. This is the first time that the show is being performed outside of its original location. The show runs November 24 through December 31 at the Pasadena Playhouse in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-356-7529 or visit www.pasadenaplayhouse.org.

“A Christmas Carol” Nineteenth-century London comes with this timeless Dickens classic and all your favorite characters—Tiny Tim and the Cratchit family, the Fezziwigs, the Ghosts of Christmas past, present and yet-to-come—and, as always, Hal Landon Jr. as everyone’s favorite curmudgeon, Ebenezer Scrooge. Written by Charles Dickens, and directed by John-David Keller, it runs November 24 through December 24 at the South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. For tickets call 714-708-5555 or visit www.scr.org.

“Vendetta Chrome” Vendetta, a late bloomer at a Victorian girls’ school, must save her friends and family from a legacy of trouble — and it’s all in the dance moves. In the West Coast premiere of Sylvan Oswald’s melodrama-farce, spirited movement sequences take a female and nonbinary cast through the lightness and the darkness of today’s feminist rage. Written by Sylvan Oswald, and directed by Sara Lyons, it runs November 24 through December 15 at the Lex Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-944-2165 or visit www.coeurage.org/buytickets.

“Dixie’s Tupperware Party” Dixie Longate is the fast-talking, gum chewing, ginger-haired Alabama gal who is bringing your grandma’s Tupperware party into the 21st century. Audiences howl with laughter as Dixie demonstrates the many alternative uses for the iconic plastic kitchen staple. Filled with outrageously funny tales, heartfelt accounts, audience participation and a little bit of empowerment and homespun wisdom, Dixie’s Tupperware Party leaves your heart a little bigger and your food a little fresher. Written by Kris Andersson, and directed by Dixie Longate, it runs November 28 through December 30 at the Kirk Douglas Theatre in Culver City. For tickets call 213-628-2772 or visit www.dixiestupperwareparty.com.

“Aphrodite’s Holiday Show” brings back Aphrodite, Dionysus and their 45-year old human daughter, Poinsettia, as they continue to work through their god/mortal issues. Aerialists, dancers, magicians, jugglers and other special guests join the fun in this winter solstice variety spectacle. Written by Lee Margaret Hanson and Adam J. Jefferis, co-Written by Rynn Vogel, and directed by Lee Margaret Hanson and Adam J. Jefferis, it runs November 29 through December 16 at the Actor’s Gang Theater in Culver City. For tickets call 310-838-4264 or visit www.TheActorsGang.com.

“1966 Holiday Variety Extravaganza” the audience travels back to the swingin’ Sixties for a night of holiday hilarity. Using audience suggestions, the award-winning Impro Theatre performs their unscripted, totally improvised LIVE variety show that delights in the comedy and music stylings of “Holiday Special” icons Andy Williams, Perry Como and Judy Garland. Written by Impro Theatre Company, it runs November 30 through December 9 at the Garry Marshall Theatre in Burbank. For tickets call 818-955-8101 or visit www.GarryMarshallTheatre.org.

“The SantaLand Diaries” Patrick Censoplano dons the candy-cane tights for a Santa Monica Playhouse holiday celebration in this outrageously funny one-man play from NPR’s well-loved humorist David Sedaris about the author’s experiences as an unemployed writer taking a job as an elf at Macy’s department store in New York City, taking a wry look at how the holiday season brings out the best – and the worst – in us all. Written by David Sedaris, adapted by Joe Mantello, and directed by Chris DeCarlo, it runs November 30 through December 16 at the Santa Monica Playhouse in Santa Monica. For tickets call 310-394-9779 Ext. 1 or visit www.SantaMonicaPlayhouse.com.

 

Enjoy life more – see a show tonight!

“Scene in LA” October 2018 by Steve Zall and Sid Fish

Here are some of the shows you can see in our local theaters this month:

“Villainy, or H.H. Holmes’ Own Story” the incredible true story of H.H. Holmes (1861-1896), America’s first serial killer. Born Herman Webster Mudgett, his favored alias was H.H. Holmes, reportedly assuming the name in tribute to the fictional master of mystery, Sherlock. A master seducer of women, Holmes was ultimately married to three women simultaneously. His many crimes included arson, insurance fraud, torture and murder. He confessed to 27 murders in a memoir, written in a response to a lucrative offer from newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst. Having received training in the medical profession, Holmes sometimes dissected the bodies of his victims, selling their skeletons to medical schools. In the most brazen portion of his career, Holmes had a “murder castle” with a pharmacy, a torture chamber, apartments for young women who disappeared mysteriously… all just three miles east of the Columbian Exposition (the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair), giving rise to Holmes’ nickname, “the Devil in the White City”. Written by John Strysik, and directed by Jeff G. Rack, it runs October 3 through November 7 at the Whitefire Theatre in Sherman Oaks. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.villainy.brownpapertickets.com.

“The Bench, A Homeless Love Story” Based on true stories, this drama explores the emotional anguish of five homeless characters and the catastrophic hysteria surrounding the AIDS crisis in the 1980’s. Humor and heartbreak bring these stories to life, based on real people in the writer’s life. Written by Robert Galinsky, and directed by Jay O. Sanders, it runs October 4 through November 9 at the Hudson Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-960-7822 or visit www.plays411.com.

“The Tempest” Free, but reservations are required. This great romantic comedy has it all: danger, intrigue, politics, revenge, a mighty sorcerer, her beautiful daughter falling deeply in love at first sight, for the very first time, with the handsome prince who is so conveniently shipwrecked near her beach home. The play still exerts an influence over popular culture nearly four centuries later, ranging from Forbidden Planet to Gilligan’s Island to Lost. Written by William Shakespeare, and directed by Rebecca Lynne, it runs October 4 through October 20 at the Brand Park in Glendale. For tickets visit www.deanproductionstheatre.com.

“Resa Fantastiskt Mystisk” tells the story of Philip, a struggling painter who goes on a fantastical journey to reclaim his right to be an artist (the title roughly translates to ‘Journey Extremely Mysterious’.). Written by Lars Mattsun, translated by Todd Merrill, and directed by Todd Merrill, it runs October 5 through November 3 at the Broadwater Main Stage at Sacred Fools in Los Angeles. For tickets visit www.sacredfools.org.

“Johnny Got His Gun” The narrator, twenty-year-old Joe Bonham, got his gun and went to war in 1918. An exploding shell in World War I reduced him to a silent life, silent on the outside but not on the inside. Far from home, in a hospital bed in Europe, Joe Bonham is without a voice but ready for battle, ready to explode with rage at what the war left behind. A story about survival and the unyielding and persistent need in all human beings to live with dignity and purpose, it reminds us that behind every casualty of war there is the story of a young person whose hopes, aspirations and dreams have been stolen from them. Written by Dalton Trumbo, adapted by Bradley Rand Smith, and directed by Tim Robbins, it runs October 6 through November 10 at the Actors’ Gang Theatre in Culver City. For tickets call 310-838-4264 or visit www.TheActorsGang.com.

“The Madwoman of Chaillot” with love and magic at a sidewalk café where artists, ragmen and madwomen become aware of a diabolical plan to drill for oil in the middle of Paris. The Madwoman develops a scheme with her eccentric circle of friends to stop the men and their insatiable lust for oil. Written by Jean Giraudoux, adapted by Maurice Valency, and directed by Tim Robbins, it runs October 6 through November 10 at the Actors’ Gang Theatre in Culver City. For tickets call 310-838-4264 or visit www.TheActorsGang.com.

“Oppenheimer” Fascism is spreading across Europe. Two German chemists discover the processes of atomic fission. In Berkeley, California, theoretical physicists recognize the horrendous potential of this new science: a weapon that draws its power from the very building blocks of the universe. Ambitious and charismatic, J. Robert Oppenheimer finds himself uniquely placed to spearhead the largest scientific undertaking in all of human history, the Manhattan Project and the creation of the Atomic bomb. Could it bring about an end of World War II, and all wars? Written by Tom Morton-Smith, and directed by John Perrin Flynn, it runs October 6 through December 30 at the Electric Lodge in Venice. For tickets call 855-585-5185 or visit www.roguemachinetheatre.com.

“Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike” In Bucks County, Penn., Vanya and Sonia share a country house and fret endlessly—and amusingly—about their hapless lives. When Masha, their self-absorbed movie-star sister, and her much, much younger boy toy, Spike, visit for the weekend, the entire household gets hilariously upended. Rivalries are rekindled, resentments rage, the housekeeper blurts out strange prophecies and Masha announces she’s selling the house. Written by Christopher Durang, and directed by Bart DeLorenzo, it runs October 6 through October 21 at the South Coast Repertory Julianne Argyros Stage in Costa Mesa. For tickets call 714-708-5555 or visit www.scr.org.

“Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead” Hamlet is turned topsy-turvy in this brilliant comedy that thrusts Shakespeare’s two minor characters to the frontlines with no rules except one: they are destined to die. Trapped in a universe where the flip of a coin always comes up heads and pirates can pop-up anytime, Rosencrantz and Guildenstern engage in a battle of wits to try to escape their fate and make sense of a senseless world. Written by Tom Stoppard, and directed by Geoff Elliott, it runs October 7 through November 18 at the A Noise Within in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-356-3121 or visit www.anoisewithin.org.

“Silence! The Musical” follows rookie FBI agent Clarice Starling as she matches wits with the brilliant but insane cannibal, Dr. Hannibal Lecter, in order to catch the serial killer known as Buffalo Bill. Clarice faces her own demons while racing the clock to unlock Lecter’s clues before another innocent girl is killed and skinned by Buffalo Bill. This laugh-out-loud naughty satire features a singing and dancing chorus of lambs narrating the action as Buffalo Bill gleefully dances a hoedown while kidnapping hapless Catherine Martin. Even Dr. Lecter, scary as ever, sings about the life he’d like to lead someday outside the prison walls. Along the way, the entertaining lambs keep the story moving from scene-by-scene with musical commentary and tons of laughter! Written by Hunter Bell, with music by Jon Kaplan & Al Kaplan, and directed by Amanda Conlon, it runs October 11 through November 3 at the Let Live Theatre at The Actors Company in Hollywood. For tickets visit www.bucketlisttheatre.com/tickets.

 

“42nd Street” Starring Phantom of the Opera’s Davis Gaines as Julian Marsh! Grab your tap shoes and come meet those dancing feet in the American dream fable of Broadway. Young Peggy Sawyer is looking to make it on the great white way. When the leading lady of a new Broadway musical gets injured, Peggy might have the shot at stardom she has always been dreaming of. This mother of all musicals features the beloved and iconic “Lullaby of Broadway,” “42nd Street,” “We’re in the Money,” “I Only Have Eyes for You,” and much more. Written by Michael Stewart & Mark Bramble, with music by Harry Warren, lyrics by Al Dubin and Johnny Mercer, and directed by David F.M. Vaughn, it runs October 12 through October 28 at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts in Cerritos. For tickets call 800-300-4345 or visit www.3dtheatricals.org.

“The Boys Next Door” Mingled with scenes from the daily lives of these four, where “little things” sometimes become momentous (and often very funny), are moments of great poignancy when, with touching effectiveness, we are reminded that the handicapped, like the rest of us, want only to love and laugh and find some meaning and purpose in the brief time that they are allotted on this earth. As such, this play explores friendship, love and loss in ways universal to all of us. We all fight with filters and obstacles in our lives, but the actors and characters in this production face challenges steeper than most. It is the experience and living truth of the actors that will fill these characters’ stories with physical and emotional authenticity. Written by Tom Griffin, and directed by Jeremy Aldridge, it runs October 12 through November 10 at the Blue Door in Culver City. For tickets call 310-425-8215 or visit www.creoutreach.org.

“Double Play” It sounds like a play about baseball, but it is really about two loners who meet at the crack of dawn in front of Yankee Stadium. Thirty-eight years later, Act Two, Home Plate, completes this romantic comedy, which follows two lonely people who meet in front of Yankee Stadium through the course of their courtship and a 28-year marriage. Written by Dennis Danziger, and directed by Matthew Leavitt, it runs October 12 through November 4 at the Stephanie Feury Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-463-7378 or visit www.doubleplay.brownpapertickets.com.

“Real Women Have Curves” In a tiny, family-run factory, fabric flies and tempers flare when Ana, fresh out of high school, rebels against the status quo with dreams of becoming a writer. But deportation and the pressure to not abandon her heritage become a heated debate. These incredibly strong women gossip about food and sex and love… and size, while rewriting Corporate America’s definition of beauty. It’s a coming of age comedy, set in East LA. Written by Josefina López, and directed by Mary Jo DuPrey, it runs October 12 through November 18 at the Garry Marshall Theatre in Burbank. For tickets call 818-955-8101 or visit www.garrymarshalltheatre.org.

“Talking Trees” is a therapeutic tale centered around a mixed race couple and their refusal to effectively communicate, giving race permission to be the silent killer of their relationship. This absurd dark comedy compares the couple’s relationship to the irony of nature and the balance of its four seasons. Nature has no problem navigating the changes and messages sent within those seasons, but what is it with humans? Written by Lonnie Hughes, and directed by Marjorie LeWit, it runs October 12 through November 11 at the Secret Rose Theatre in North Hollywood. For tickets visit www.TalkingTreesPlay.com.

“To Dad with Love: A Tribute to Buddy Ebsen” represents the culmination of Kiki Ebsen’s vision of a full-scale entertainment tribute to the life and career of her father, Buddy Ebsen. Early in her career, Kiki established herself as a dynamic singer/songwriter, musician and artist whose vast musical range combines elements of jazz, pop, classical and rock. Written by Kiki Ebsen, and directed by Steve E. Feinberg, it runs October 12 through October 14 at the Theatre West in Studio City. For tickets call 323-851-7977 or visit www.theatrewest.org.

“Cal in Camo” Do wounds from the past irrevocably impact our capacity to connect? Heartfelt and mysterious, this play probes the nature of bonding in family relationships, and beyond. With an unexpected sense of humor towards humanity, it mines those sometimes excruciating revelations that are necessary before healing can begin. Written by William Francis Hoffman, and directed by Amy K. Harmon, it runs October 13 through November 9 at the VS Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-739-4411 or visit www.reddogsquadron.com.

“Kings” The story follows Sydney Millsap, who wins a seat in Congress and is determined to drain the swamp. Then she meets Kate, a whip-smart lobbyist who gets her clients whatever they want. When Kate helps Sydney try to unseat a powerful senator steeped in cronyism, the result, is a sleek, fast-paced, absorbing and very funny look at the corrosive effect of money on politics. It’s a play that lets audiences laugh, think and hope. Written by Sarah Burgess, and directed by Dámaso Rodríguez, it runs October 13 through November 10 at the South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. For tickets call 714-708-5555 or visit www.scr.org.

“18 Minutes of Fame: A Musical Journey with Barbara Minkus” You’ve seen her —a lot: On stage, on screen and especially on television. Other than the fact that she never became actually famous, she’s had what most performers would consider an enviable career. Because she started out as, and remains, an accomplished singer, her show business memoir is a musical one. Her road hasn’t always been an easy one. She faced physical challenges. She had to conceal her stage mother’s ongoing infidelities. Aspiring early on to sing opera, Barbara found her audiences steering her in the direction of musical comedy. Gaining a foothold in national media, she worked with the show business greats. She appeared 25 times as a raconteur and singer on The Merv Griffin Show; Appeared on TV with Danny Kaye and Jerry Lewis; 27 episodes of Love, American Style as a variety of characters; stints on Tosh O; Getting On; The Tonight Show. Her stage career has included the touring company of Funny Girl (as Fanny Brice); a starring role on Broadway in The Education of Hyman Kaplan; Off-Broadway roles in Picon Pie (as Molly Picon); Don’t Leave It All to Your Children; Rondelay. She starred locally as Jennie Grossinger in Saturday Night at Grossinger’s. She also had roles in nine feature films. Along the way, she found true love. A trip to Israel with her husband brought her closer to her Jewish roots. Written by Susan Morgenstern and Barbara Minkus, and directed by Susan Morgenstern, it runs October 14 through October 21 at the Pico in Los Angeles. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.18MinutesOfFame.brownpapertickets.com.

“Sell/Buy/Date” is an exuberant show inspired by the real-life experiences of people affected by the sex industry. Brimming with Jones’ dazzling medley of masterful, multicultural characterizations, the play presents an honest, moving, and even humorous look at a complex and fascinating subject, all while preserving the full humanity of voices seldom heard in the theatre. Written by Sarah Jones, and directed by Carolyn Cantor, it runs October 14 through November 18 at the Renberg Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-860-7300 or visit www.lalgbtcenter.org/theatre.

“Return to the Forbidden Planet” follows the adventures of the dashing spaceship captain Tempest and his crew, who hit a meteor shower and are then mysteriously drawn off course to the planet D’Illyria. There they discover the mad scientist Dr. Prospero and his beautiful daughter Miranda, along with the robot Ariel. As a romance develops between Captain Tempest and Miranda, a monster threatens the spaceship, and a sacrifice is made to ensure everyone’s safety. Written by Bob Carlton, and directed by Kirby Ward, it runs October 17 through November 4 at the Rubicon Theatre in Ventura. For tickets call 805-667-2900 or visit www.rubicontheatre.org.

“The Woman in Black” A man obsessed, believing his family has been cursed by a ghostly woman in black, tells his terrifying story to exorcise the fear that grips his soul. It all begins innocently enough, but as he reaches further into his darkest memories, he quickly finds that there is no turning back. Written by Susan Hill, adapted by Stephen Mallatratt, and directed by Robin Herford, it runs October 17 through November 11 at the Pasadena Playhouse in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-356-7529 or visit www.PasadenaPlayhouse.org.

“Bride of Blood” King Solomon, the son of King David, was famed as the wisest King in all the world. With 700 wives and 300 concubines, his truest love may be the Queen of Sheba, and a ruler of power in her own right. The King attempts to plumb occult Hebrew mysteries, but his understanding is challenged by Exodus 4:24. A perplexing passage in which Moses, his wife Zipporah and their child are endangered by the wrath of God. In his quest and mastery of occult secrets, Solomon is overtaken by his own pride and commits a serious infraction against the will of the Almighty. This opens a path for Solomon’s arch-enemy, Asmodeus, The Demon of Wrath, to enter the land of the living. Seeing into the future, Solomon embarks on a desperate attempt to avert the sacking of Jerusalem and the destruction of the Temple. Written and directed by Amit Itelman, it runs October 18 through November 8 at the Skylight Theater in Hollywood. For tickets visit www.trepanyhouse.org.

 

“Vietgone” spins a modern twist on the classic boy-meets-girl story: Quang and Tong are refugees fleeing the Vietnam War, who hook up and fall in love in a relocation camp in Arkansas. Bold, and fearless, this production takes audiences on a hilariously rip-roaring ride across 1970s America with a hot soundtrack that serves up hip-hop, sass, and revolution. Written by Qui Nguyen, with music by Shammy Dee, and directed by Jennifer Chang, it runs October 18 through November 11 at the David Henry Hwang Theater in Los Angeles. For tickets call 213-625-7000 or visit www.eastwestplayers.org.

“Radiant Vermin” A wickedly funny satire flecked with horror. In this outrageous comedy with a killer heart, Ollie and Jill want to tell you about their dream home — but some of the things they did to get it… well, you might find them kind of shocking. Written by Philip Ridley, and directed by Tim True, it runs October 19 through November 18 at the Odyssey Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-477-2055 Ext. 2 or visit www.dn3theatre.org.

“Señor Plummer’s Final Fiesta” It’s 1942 and you receive an invitation to the book launch of Señor Plummer: The Life and Laughter of an Old Californian, Eugenio Plummer’s (mostly) true account of his life in early Los Angeles. You arrive in the newly dedicated Plummer Park, only steps away from where Plummer himself has lived since 1877. From Señor Plummer’s darkest nightmares, to his most luminous joys, you will be armed with only a treasure map of Señor Plummer’s mind. The adventures you encounter are not always friendly, not always logical, but always exist in the vibrant, mysteriously shifting ground at the very heart of Eugene Plummer, the original resident of West Hollywood. Written by Diana Burbano, Tom Jacobson, and Chelsea Sutton with Rogue Artists Ensemble, and directed by Sean T. Cawelti, it runs October 19 through November 18 at the Plummer Park in West Hollywood. For tickets visit www.RogueArtists.org.

“Shrek the Musical” Set in a mythical “once upon a time” sort of land, this is the story of a hulking green ogre who, after being mocked and feared his entire life by anything that crosses his path, retreats to an ugly green swamp to exist in happy isolation. Written by David Linsday-Abaire, with music by Jeanine Tesori, lyrics by David Linsday-Abaire, and directed by Kirsten Chandler, it runs October 19 through October 28 at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza in Thousand Oaks. For tickets call 800-745-3000 or visit www.5startheatricals.com.

“A Splintered Soul” A gripping drama about war refugees haunted by the death of their loved ones — and by memories of the things they had to do to survive. It’s 1947 in San Francisco, home to a group of resettled Holocaust survivors from Poland whose very existence depended on blurring the lines between right and wrong. It is there we meet Rabbi Kroeller and a group of morally starved refugees as they seek to define their existence in this new, tidy post-war America. How can these splintered souls adapt to a new life in a new land, where all the rules have changed? Written by Alan L. Brooks, and directed by Marya Mazor, it runs October 19 through November 4 at the International City Theatre Long Beach Performing Arts Center in Long Beach. For tickets call 562-436-4610 or visit www.InternationalCityTheatre.org.

“Sunny Afternoon” November 22nd, 1963. The kickoff of a 46-hour interrogation of Lee Harvey Oswald in the custody of Dallas Homicide Captain Will Fritz, where they discuss Baynes Barron, Russia, Coca-Cola, Jim Brown, a mysterious package, backyard photographs and Friday afternoon in Dealy Plaza. Written and directed by Christian Levatino, it runs October 19 through November 18 at the Complex Hollywood The Flight Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets visit www.thebigeventlive.com.

“…meantime at HoJo’s” Friday night June 16th, 1972. Across the street from the Watergate Complex, eight men sit inside a Howard Johnson’s motel room and wait. What happens over the next five hours will set in action a series of events that will end the Presidency of Richard Nixon. Written and directed by Christian Levatino, it runs October 20 through November 18 at the Complex Hollywood The Flight Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets visit www.thebigeventlive.com.

 

“Cost of Living” John is a rich, quick-witted grad student who has cerebral palsy. Ani is a hilariously foul-mouthed quadriplegic. The people who help them, Jess and Eddie, have their own struggles to contend with. This is a haunting, rigorously unsentimental play about the forces that bring people together and the realities of facing the world with physical disabilities. Written by Martyna Majok, and directed by John Vreeke, it runs October 20 through December 16 at the Fountain Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-663-1525 or visit www.FountainTheatre.com.

“King Dick” Christmastime, 1970. The King just spent 100G’s on gifts, and he’s on the run from Graceland. High on Demerol and liquid Ritalin, and with the help of his dead twin brother Jesse, Elvis concocts a scheme to offer the leader of the free world his influential voice in exchange for a new symbol of power. This was the last time anyone would be allowed to cold call the President of the United States. Written and directed by Christian Levatino, it runs October 20 through November 18 at the Complex Hollywood The Flight Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets visit www.thebigeventlive.com.

“Mark Twain and Friends: A River Journey” is a wonderful, family-friendly piece that goes deep into very topical subjects such as prejudice, religion, and education, with Twain’s signature humor and pathos. Mark Twain returns from The Beyond to introduce some of the characters he met in his travels. Written by Greg White, and directed by Gary Lamb, it runs October 20 through November 18 at the Parson’s Nose Theater in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-403-7667 or visit www.parsonsnose.com.

“Murder on the Orient Express” All aboard! The exotic Orient Express is hurtling down the tracks…to a murder! With a train full of suspects and an alibi for each one, it’s the perfect mystery for the dapper detective Hercule Poirot. Romantic, dramatic and sumptuous, this first-ever stage adaptation of Agatha Christie’s suspenseful masterpiece comes to life in this stylish production. Book your passage today for the thrill-ride of the season! Written by Agatha Christie, adapted by Ken Ludwig, and directed by Sheldon Epps, it runs October 20 through November 11 at the La Mirada Theatre for the Performing Arts in La Mirada. For tickets call 562-944-9801 or visit www.lamiradatheatre.com.

“Steambath” What if God turned out to be a Puerto Rican steam bath attendant, assisted by a butler named Gottlieb? Renowned standup comedian and actor Paul Rodriguez stars in a revival of the hilarious, razor sharp, 1970 off Broadway hit comedy. Written by Bruce Jay Friedman, and directed by Ron Sossi, it runs October 20 through December 16 at the Odyssey Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-477-2055 Ext. 2 or visit www.OdysseyTheatre.com.

“The Tragedie of Macbeth” nine actors perform all the roles. They guide audience members from the Witches Heath, down the haunted hallways of Macbeth’s castle, and to the unsuspecting Macduff family’s peaceful home. Audiences pay a visit to the lair of the “double trouble” witches brewing around their cauldron and finally witness a fateful battle where a confrontation between rival adversaries pitches good against evil. The 360-degree performance ranges through five separate locations staged throughout SCLA’s Downtown LA facility, located on the corner of 1st Street and Bixel. To maximize suspense and intimacy, the number of audience members per performance is limited. Written by William Shakespeare, and directed by Kenn Sabberton, it runs October 20 through November 3 at the Shakespeare Center of Los Angeles in Los Angeles. For tickets call 866-710-8942 or visit www.shakespearecenter.org/macbeth.

“The Seafarer” It’s Christmas Eve in a small coastal village north of Dublin, and Sharky has returned to look after his irascible, aging brother who’s recently gone blind. As Sharky attempts to stay off the bottle during the holidays, he contends with old drinking buddies Ivan and Nicky, who are holed up at the house too, hoping to play some cards. With the arrival of a stranger from the distant past, the stakes are raised ever higher and Sharky may be playing for his very soul. Written by Conor McPherson, and directed by Michael Matthews, it runs October 21 through November 4 at the Laguna Playhouse in Laguna Beach. For tickets call 949-497-2787 or visit www.lagunaplayhouse.com.

“The Animal Monologues” Fast-moving, entertaining, and full of heart, the piece features the hopeful perspective of a young descendent of last living 9/11 Search and Rescue dog, Bretagne, who worked twelve-hour shifts at Ground Zero and became an international symbol of 9/11 heroism. When researching the story, Raasch learned that over 300 dogs from all over the world had worked the World Trade Center site, many entering spaces too tight for firefighters. As the mission turned from rescue to recovery, firefighters hid in the rubble to give the dogs a reason to keep looking. Written by Amy Raasch, with music by David Poe, and directed by Matthew McCray, it runs October 25 through November 18 at the Bootleg Theater in Los Angeles. For tickets visit www.TheAnimalMonologues.com.

“The Little Foxes” another epic drama about a Southern family in crisis. Set in the Deep South of 1900, where women have scant options and men seem to hold all the power, Regina Giddens will stop at nothing — even blackmail — to wrest the family business away from her scheming brothers. Written by Lillian Hellman, and directed by Cameron Watson, it runs October 25 through December 10 at the Kiki & David Gindler Performing Arts Center in Glendale. For tickets call 818-506-1983 or visit www.Antaeus.org.

 

“Desert Rats” Brothers Frank and Jesse reunite to plan a kidnapping in a squalid motel room on a hellish day in Barstow. When day turns into night and their hostage is brought out of the trunk, the siblings find their troubles have just begun. Written by Nate Rufus Edelman, and directed by Angie Scott, it runs October 27 through November 18 at the Los Angeles Theatre Center in Los Angeles. For tickets call 866-811-4111 or visit www.thelatc.org.

“Letters from Home” Kalean Ung’s multimedia solo show weaves together her Cambodian family’s refugee story; her own story as a bi-racial, first-generation American; and Shakespeare’s iconic female characters into a unique theatrical experience. In 2016, Kalean learned of a drawer in her father’s study, filled with letters from family and friends living in desperate circumstances in refugee camps and detailing their lives during the genocide with the rise of the Khmer Rouge. This story examines her own life through the stories her father (acclaimed composer Chinary Ung) told her of arriving in America in the 1960s as a young music student, and his subsequent quest to rescue his family members. Written by Kalean Ung, with music by Chinary Ung, and directed by Marina McClure, it runs October 27 through November 18 at the Independent Studio in Atwater. For tickets call 818-710-6306 or visit www.iscla.org.

“Members Only” The year is 1982: the golden age of boxing, the dying gasp of disco, the flowering of identity politics — a time before AIDS had a name. Two decades have taken their toll on Pedro Quinn, a gay Latino prizefighter still fighting well into his 40s, ducking his living-legend status and mourning a man he killed in the ring years ago. Meanwhile, a new generation continues to push the cultural and sexual envelope in and out of the ring. Written by Oliver Mayer, and directed by José Luis Valenzuela, it runs October 27 through November 18 at the Los Angeles Theatre Center in Los Angeles. For tickets call 866-811-4111 or visit www.thelatc.org.

 

“The Woman Who Went to Space as a Man” Part fact, part fever dream, and part musical, this captivating new work opens with Alice B. Sheldon – better known to sci-fi aficionados as author James Tiptree, Jr. – contemplating suicide. Dodging in and out of reality, the play, with a bold musical score, investigates gender, longing and creativity as self-exploration through one of the Science Fiction world’s greatest literary tricksters. Sheldon was most notable for breaking down the barriers between writing perceived as inherently ‘male’ or ‘female’ and it was not publicly known until 1977 that Tiptree was, in fact, a woman. Written and directed by Maureen Huskey, with music by Yuval Ron, it runs October 27 through November 18 at the Son of Semele Theater in Los Angeles. For tickets call 818-841-5422 or visit www.sonofsemele.org.

“Dr. Jekyll & Mr. Hyde” this new adaptation takes place on the dismal streets of London in the 1860s, where societal pressures silence a gentle doctor’s questions about the nature of morality. As the pressure intensifies, Dr. Jekyll takes matters into his own hands. Will his efforts save the world, or will they destroy all that he holds dear? After all, the road to hell is paved with good intentions. Written by Burt Grinstead and Anna Stromberg, and directed by Anna Stromberg, it runs October 29 through October 31 at the LGBT Center’s Davidson/Valentini Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-860-7300 or visit www.lalgbtcenter.org/theatre.

 

Enjoy life more – see a show tonight!

“Scene in LA” September 2018 by Steve Zall and Sid Fish

Here are some of the shows you can see in our local theaters this month:
 

“I Dig Rock and Roll Music” is a celebration of folk-rock then and now. Described as a theatrical concert, the evening features songs from 1965 through the 1970s made famous by Peter, Paul and Mary; The Mamas and the Papas; Carole King; Joni Mitchell; Carly Simon; The Fifth Dimension; The Association; Otis Redding; Cat Stevens; The Youngbloods; The Beatles; The Eagles; and many others. Written by James O’Neil, George Grove, and Dan Wheetman, with music by Noel Paul Stookey, and directed by James O’Neil, it runs September 1 through September 23 at the Rubicon Theatre in Ventura. For tickets call 805-667-2900 or visit www.rubicontheatre.org.

“Infidel” A suspense thriller that explores religious superstition and terrorism in the name of Islam versus unscrupulous Western imperialism and war mongering. When an American anthropologist is kidnapped in Baghdad by seemingly ruthless fundamentalists, an exchange of ideas with his captors evolves into a spiritual quest for the meaning of faith. Written and directed by Christopher Vened, it runs September 1 through October 7 at the Whitefire Theatre in Sherman Oaks. For tickets call 323-960-7738 or visit www.WhitefireTheatre.com.

“Sense and Sensibility” follows the Dashwood sisters—practical Elinor and impulsive Marianne—who are of good social standing and marriageable age. When their father dies and their half-brother skimps on their inheritance, the sisters are forced to leave their grand estate for a tiny, cold cottage. Just as life seems at its bleakest, a handsome stranger arrives on horseback and the sisters are convinced their futures are secured. Written by Jane Austen, adapted by Jessica Swale, and directed by Casey Stangl, it runs September 1 through September 29 at the South Coast Repertory in Costa Mesa. For tickets call 714-708-5555 or visit www.scr.org.

“Native Gardens” In this new comedy, horticultures clash, turning well-intentioned neighbors into feuding enemies. It’s the War of the Hoses where cultures collide and mudslinging ensues – literally. Good fences don’t always make good neighbors, but they do make for a lot of laughs in this new play. Written by Karen Zacarías, and directed by Jason Alexander, it runs September 5 through September 30 at the Pasadena Playhouse in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-356-7529 or visit www.PasadenaPlayhouse.org.

“The World Goes ‘Round” is a celebration of life and the fighting spirit that keeps us all going. The cast finds themselves careening through the world of love, babies and coffee. From Cabaret to Chicago, the nonstop hit-parade features unforgettable gems, including “Mr. Cellophane,” “My Coloring Book,” “All That Jazz,” “Kiss of the Spider Woman,” “Money, Money,” “Maybe This Time,” “Cabaret” and “New York, New York” seamlessly interwoven into a passionate, harmonious, up-tempo evening of musical theatre. Written by John Kander and Fred Ebb, with music by John Kander, lyrics by Fred Ebb, and directed by Richard Israel, it runs September 5 through September 16 at the UCLA’s Freud Playhouse in Los Angeles. For tickets call 866-811-4111 or visit www.Reprise2.org.

“Dangerous Obsession” takes place on a sunny afternoon in the Home Counties. Sally Driscoll is watering her plants in the conservatory of her luxurious home. Suddenly, John Barrett appears at the door. Sally does not recognize John, but it seems that the Driscolls and the Barretts have met before. After Sally’s husband, Mark, arrives it becomes apparent that someone has a very dangerous obsession. Audiences will twist and turn with the plot in this psychological thriller. Written by N.J. Crisp, and directed by Kathy Dershimer, it runs September 7 through October 13 at the Westchester Playhouse in Westchester. For tickets call 310-645-5156 or visit www.kentwoodplayers.org.

“Inspecting Carol” Get your holiday cheer on with this hilarious, madcap comedy! Behind the scenes of a struggling theatre’s annual slapdash production of A Christmas Carol, rehearsals are at a standstill. Tim is no longer Tiny, Scrooge wants to do the play in Spanish (Feliz Navidad), and their funding is on hold pending an inspection. This laugh out loud spoof makes for a night at the theatre that is anything but show business as usual. Written by Daniel Sullivan, and directed by Kirsten Chandler, it runs September 7 through September 23 at the Hillcrest Center for the Arts in Thousand Oaks. For tickets visit www.panicproductions.org.

“Martians- an Evening with Ray Bradbury” America’s Storyteller, Ray Bradbury, is our guide to mankind’s next great adventure, to our next outpost in outer space, the planet Mars. Ray Bradbury speaks directly to the audience weaving Martians stories both humorous and harrowing, bringing his characters to life on stage right before your eyes. Characters like Bob and Carrie, a young couple struggling to turn the cold, dead Mars into an Earthly garden. There are Beck and Craig, two soldiers of fortune searching for the legendary Blue Bottle of Mars! Father Niven’s religious faith traps a shapeshifting Martian in the form of Christ! Emil Barton is the last man on Mars with only recordings of his younger self to keep him company, or drive him mad! As Ray creates his stories we come to know the mind and heart of the great writer who believes that humanity can only survive by carrying our culture out into the Universe! Most of the text is taken from Ray’s own words, from interviews and books he’s written on the art of writing, as well as adaptations of his Martian stories: The Strawberry Window, The Blue Bottle, The Messiah and Night Call, Collect. Written by Charlie Mount and Jeff G. Rack, and directed by Jeff G. Rack, it runs September 7 through November 2 at the Whitefire Theatre in Sherman Oaks. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.whitefiretheatre.com.

“Time Stands Still” Sarah is a photojournalist for a magazine. James, her boyfriend, is a foreign correspondent. Both have returned home to their apartment in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, after suffering traumas during a stint on assignment in Afghanistan. James’ wounds are largely emotional. Sarah, however, took a shrapnel hit to the face. Her mobility was also impaired when the vehicle in which she was riding was blown up. Her local guide was killed. Very much currently in their orbit are their boss Richard (who is also Sarah’s long-ago lover) and Richard’s new young-and-hot love Mandy. Sarah loves photography. It enables her an element of control in a world spinning madly. When she snaps the shutter of her camera, Time Stands Still. James is fine with building a normal life in New York. Sarah clearly relishes the challenge of finding the perfect image, the powerful rush that comes with taking the photo and making time stand still in a dangerous world. Can their relationship survive? Written by Donald Margulies, and directed by Joel Zwick, it runs September 7 through September 30 at the Lounge Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.timestandsstill.brownpapertickets.com.

“Two’s a Crowd” They say opposites attract. They haven’t met Tom and Wendy. Forced together by a computer error, freewheeling Tom and uptight Wendy do their best to ruin each other’s vacations. Will they get to know each other well enough to reveal the real reasons behind their travel? Will they agree on sleeping arrangements? Will room service ever arrive? Written by Martin Bergman & Rita Rudner, with music by Jason Feddy, and directed by Martin Bergman, it runs September 7 through September 16 at the Laguna Playhouse in Laguna Beach. For tickets call 949-497-2787 or visit www.lagunaplayhouse.com.

“Breadcrumbs” is about a reclusive fiction writer diagnosed with dementia, who must depend upon a troubled young caretaker to complete her autobiography. Written by Jennifer Haley, and directed by Bert Emmett, it runs September 8 through October 14 at the Lonny Chapman Theatre in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-763-5990 or visit www.thegrouprep.com.

“The Gin Game” Weller Martin tries desperately to retain some control over his life despite falling into ill health and becoming a reluctant resident of a nursing home. Fonsia Dorsey serves as the symbol of all gone wrong, and his battles with her, though over a simple game of gin, become not only a conflict with the woman but with divine will itself. Written by D.L. Coburn, and directed by Christian Lebano, it runs September 8 through October 6 at the Sierra Madre Playhouse in Sierra Madre. For tickets call 626-355-4318 or visit www.sierramadreplayhouse.org.

“Black!” In this dynamic, funny and deeply truthful performance, actor, playwright and storyteller Michael Washington Brown shatters stereotypes, playing out the life stories of four men from around the world (the U.S., England, Jamaica and Africa), each of whom is black — but each of whom has a very different idea about what that means. Written and directed by Michael Washington Brown, it runs September 9 through October 14 at the Zephyr Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.blackonemanshow.brownpapertickets.com.

 

“The Untranslatable Secrets of Nikki Corona” is a poignant journey through love, hope and the unknown. How many of us have wished for one more chance to say the right thing? A Better Orpheus Inc. provides an alternative to regret—a service that allows the living to communicate with the dead. When Nikki Corona loses her twin sister, A Better Orpheus puts her in touch with Orlando, a man dying too young. The ensuing love story leads to a quest through a vivid, fantastical afterlife as Orlando learns whether Nikki’s message to her sister has the ability to transcend death. Written by José Rivera, and directed by Jo Bonney, it runs September 12 through October 7 at the Gil Cates Theater at the Geffen Playhouse in Westwood. For tickets call 310-208-5454 or visit www.geffenplayhouse.org.

“Fire in the Dark House” two young lovers, their families and community are thrown into turmoil as a result of a vicious anti-immigrant campaign by the U.S. President during World War I. Written by Mona Z. Smith and Traci Mariano, it runs September 13 through November 15 at the Whitefire Theatre in Sherman Oaks. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.fireinadarkhouse.bpt.me.

“Suburban Showgirl” is a hilarious and heartfelt tour-de-force about the life of the professional dancer Wendy Walker, who finds her perfectly choreographed life spinning out of control. Singing and dancing non-stop, Palmer Davis plays over 18 characters that will take audiences deep into the unpredictable journey of a dancer’s life. Written by Palmer Davis, with music by Ross Källing, and directed by Cate Caplin, it runs September 13 through September 16 at the Colony Theatre in Burbank. For tickets call 866-811-4111 or visit www.colonytheatre.org.

“All Night Long” The thin line between waking and dreaming, the conscious and subconscious, is exposed in an outrageously funny, surreal sit-com about 18 hours in the life of an all-American nuclear family. Written by John O’Keefe, and directed by Jan Munroe, it runs September 14 through October 21 at the Atwater Village Theatre in Atwater Village. For tickets call 323-882-6912 or visit www.openfist.org.

“The Beauty Queen of Leenane” Set in a small Irish town, a spinster who has cared for her aging, manipulative mother for twenty years, has a final chance at happiness with a local man. Suffocated dreams and simmering resentments surface, culminating in an unexpected climax. Written by Martin McDonagh, and directed by Mark Kemble, it runs September 14 through October 21 at the studio/stage in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-960-7774 or visit www.plays411.com/leenane.

“I Am Charlie” explores the question: Why is the Charlie meme chiseled in granite when other 20th century memes (JFK, for example) are completely and continuously malleable? Most people will agree what was bizarre in 1969 would be old news in a few days and forgotten in a week. This is NOT the play you were expecting about Charles Manson. It looks at the Charles Manson story (Among other things) through the mind of Charlie himself. Written by Stephen A Cardinal, and directed by Tom Waters, it runs September 14 through October 21 at the Promenade Playhouse in Santa Monica. For tickets visit www.promenadeplayhouse.com.

“The Mousetrap” A group of strangers is stranded in a boarding house during a snow storm, one of whom is a murderer. Suspects include the newly married couple who run the house, a spinster with a curious background, an architect who seems better equipped to be a chef, a retired Army major, a strange little man who claims his car has overturned in a drift, and a jurist who makes life miserable for everyone. Into their midst comes a policeman, traveling on skis. He probes the background of everyone present, and rattles a lot of skeletons. Written by Agatha Christie, and directed by Sonny Lira, it runs September 14 through October 21 at the Crown City Theatre Company in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-605-5685 or visit www.crowncitytheatre.com.

“Broadway Bound” It’s 1949, the war is over, and America is beginning a new chapter. Eugene Jerome and his brother Stan are being given a chance to audition as comedy writers for CBS in the emerging medium of television. If they succeed, they’ll move out of the family home in Brighton Beach and into the Big City. Eugene, however, is distracted. He’s fallen in love and thinks his new girl is The One. Stan has episodes of writer’s block. Meanwhile, all is not well within the family: father Jack is often “working late” and mother Kate suspects the worst. Grandpa Ben no longer lives with his wife and resists his wealthy daughter Blanche’s attempts to move him to Florida. Will Eugene find bliss with the love of his life? Will he and Stan achieve fame and fortune? Written by Neil Simon, and directed by Howard Teichman, it runs September 15 through October 28 at the Miles Memorial Playhouse in Santa Monica. For tickets call 323-821-2449 or visit www.wcjt.tix.com.

“Gloria” Editorial assistants Ani, Dean and Kendra each hope for a starry life of letters and a book deal before they turn 30. But when an ordinary humdrum workday becomes anything but, the stakes for who will get to tell their own story become higher than ever. Bitingly funny and fierce, Gloria incisively depicts the declining, dog-eat-dog industry of publishing. As the magazine struggles with the world’s ascent into the digital age, relationships between the staff members are imploding. Written by Branden Jacobs-Jenkins, and directed by Chris Fields, it runs September 15 through October 21 at the Atwater Village Theatre in Atwater Village. For tickets call 310-307-3753 or visit www.EchoTheaterCompany.com.

“The Marriage Zone” Cal and Beth are selling their home. They’re visited by Skip and Ellie, an engaged couple, very much in love who are eager to buy their first home. They’re joined by Mike and Liz, apparently a couple of lookie-loos who decided to drop by and take a peek at the house for sale. The three couples get to chatting and begin to marvel at just how much they have in common. WAY too much in common, in fact. So much in common that it begins to become surreal. Written and directed by Jeff Gould, it runs September 15 through November 17 at the Santa Monica Playhouse in Santa Monica. For tickets call 800-838-3006 or visit www.brownpapertickets.com/event/3591184.

“A Night with Janis Joplin” Like a comet that burns far too brightly to last, Janis Joplin exploded onto the music scene in 1967 and, almost overnight, became the queen of rock & roll. The unmistakable voice, filled with raw emotion and tinged with Southern Comfort, made her a must-see headliner from Monterey to Woodstock. Fueled by such unforgettable songs as “Me and Bobby McGee,” “Piece of My Heart,” “Mercedes Benz,” “Cry Baby” and “Summertime,” this is a musical journey celebrating Janis and her biggest musical influences—icons like Aretha Franklin, Etta James, Odetta, Nina Simone and Bessie Smith, who inspired one of rock & roll’s greatest legends. Written and directed by Randy Johnson, with music by Brent Crayon, it runs September 15 through October 7 at the La Mirada Center for the Performing Arts in La Mirada. For tickets call 562-944-9801 or visit www.lamiradatheatre.com.

“Othello” Shakespeare’s classic tale of love, jealousy, betrayal and revenge gets a new look as Griot sets the tragedy in an East Asian dystopian future. Further, the entire production will not only be comprised of people of color, but will also feature women in key roles, including the notorious villain Iago. The show’s mission, much like the company’s mission, is to look at theatre in a different light, exploring themes from a new perspective. While Othello has traditionally explored white and black relations, El-Amin feels there have been several voices left out, thus the nontraditional staging. Written by William Shakespeare, and directed by Malik B. El-Amin, it runs September 15 through October 7 at the Actor’s Company in Los Angeles. For tickets visit www.GriotTheatre.org.

“26 Pebbles” is set in Newtown, Connecticut in June 2013, six months after the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, in which 20 children and six school staff were murdered. The play is not blood, gun rights, psycho killers nor gun violence. It is about how the people of a community come together, bond, cope and heal from devastating tragedy and move forward with their lives towards a more hopeful future. As Newtown’s local rabbi says, “Newtown doesn’t want to be remembered as the town of tragedy. We want to be remembered as a bridge to a new and kinder world. It’s not about the suburbs or the urban areas. It’s about the red blood that flows out of all of our veins. It’s about the clear tears that flow out of our eyes. We are all the same”. Written by Eric Ulloa, and directed by Jules Aaron, it runs September 20 through October 14 at the Theatre 40, in the Reuben Cordova Theatre in Beverly Hills. For tickets call 310-364-0535 or visit www.theatre40.org.

“Dead Boys” The end of the world. Two millennials trapped in the basement of their old high school. The only gay kid in school. And the guy who used to beat him up. Provocative, hilarious, and heartbreaking, Dead Boys is about two modern American young men who have no choice but to face fate, race, sexuality – and each other. Written by Matthew Scott Montgomery, and directed by Christopher James Raymond, it runs September 20 through September 23 at the Arthur Newman Theatre in Palm Desert. For tickets call 760-820-9169 or visit www.CLagoProductions.com/tickets.

“UK Underdog” A refreshing and highly theatrical solo show, based on true events, where a young Jewish boy in London transforms himself, through sheer force of will (and plenty of chutzpah) from bullied underdog to martial artist, boxer, community leader and animal rights activist. All proceeds from the production will benefit START Rescue as well as selected animal charities and anti-bullying groups. Written by Steve Spiro, and directed by Ann Bronston, it runs September 20 through October 28 at the Zephyr Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-960-7788 or visit www.plays411.com/ukunderdog.

“American Hero” A franchise-owned sandwich shop becomes a microcosm of recession-era America in Bess Wohl’s sharply comedic commentary on the struggles and perseverance of the American working class. When a trio of disparate and desperate “sandwich artists” at the local mall — an awkward young misfit (Laura Mann), a single mom (Anna Lamadrid) and a downsized refugee from corporate banking (Graham Outerbridge) — find themselves left to their own devices by overwhelmed franchisee Bob (Rodney To), they are forced into an unlikely alliance in order to keep the store, and themselves, afloat. Written by Bess Wohl, and directed by James Eckhouse, it runs September 21 through October 21 at the Carrie Hamilton Theatre of the Pasadena Playhouse in Pasadena. For tickets call 323-380-8843 or visit www.iamatheatre.com.

“The Rescued” What happens to a human after being abused, forgotten, and living in a cage for years? Do we find the same compassion for them, that we might find for rescue animals? Follow six souls who spend the day singing, sleeping, and wrestling their past with the present: how to trust, how to love and be loved, and how to finally feel free. Written by Julie Marie Myatt, and directed by Marya Mazor, it runs September 21 through November 11 at the Road on Magnolia in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-761-8838 or visit www.roadtheatre.org.

“Rope” Chasing a dangerous thrill and “for the fun of the thing”, two students commit the perfect murder. Written by Patrick Hamilton, and directed by Ken Sawyer, it runs September 21 through October 28 at the Actors Co-op Crossley Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-462-8460 or visit www.ActorsCo-op.org.

“Old Clown Wanted” Three aging clowns compete for a job in an absurdly comic look at man’s fear of uselessness in society. Inspired by a 1970 Federico Fellini film, theater and circus arts are intertwined in this tender, funny, cynical play by Romanian-French playwright Matei Visniec. Written by Matei Visniec, translated by Jeremy Lawrence, and directed by Florinel Fatulescu, it runs September 22 through November 4 at the Odyssey Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 310-477-2055 Ext. 2 or visit www.OdysseyTheatre.com.

“Tenor by Night” is a fantasy musical, loosely based on author-composer’s own life story as a Chinese businessman who immigrated to the United States and overcame the odds and obstacles to realizing his American dream. He founded an internationally successful mannequin business, married to a beautiful wife, and father of two wonderful children. How dare he desire more? In this Hitchcockian musical, the main character James by day designs and sells mannequins and by night, he sings, rehearsing opera. His passion and desire for a musical career has turned into an obsession. His (fictional) frustrated wife kicks him out of the house and James takes up residence at his mannequin warehouse. His next-door neighbor, a magician, with an eye on his neglected wife, befriends James – and one night helps bring all the mannequins to life. As his singing improves, James finally has his adoring and appreciative audience (his mannequins) as his life spirals out of control. What James – both the character in the musical and composer in real life — really wants is to become a great tenor. The real Chiao himself immigrated to the United States in 1980 and with his wife Lily, built a successful business, CNL Mannequins, which sells to major department stores and fashion brands. Two decades later, Chiao himself began his vocal training in 1998 eventually earning his MFA in music at CalArts in 2017 at the age of 67. At his Masters’ recital, Chiao presented selections from this new musical. Written and directed by James Chiao, with music by James Chiao, it runs September 22 through September 26 at the El Portal Theatre in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-508-4200 or visit www.TenorByNight.com.

 

“A Picture of Dorian Gray” Entranced by the beauty of his own portrait, Dorian Gray sells his soul to preserve his youth and pays a price. This haunting and seductive adaptation lets Wilde’s language and wit sparkle, but strips bare the themes of hedonism and the insatiable pursuit of pleasure. Written by Oscar Wilde, adapted by Michael Michetti, and directed by Michael Michetti, it runs September 23 through November 16 at the A Noise Within in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-356-3121 or visit www.anoisewithin.org.

“Everything That Never Happened” uses The Merchant of Venice as a jumping off point, exposing the realities of Jewish history and drawing three-dimensional characters from the stereotypes depicted in the original Shakespeare. Mantell’s fresh and time-bending story is rich with humor and heartbreak while bridging the 16th century with today and beyond. What do we lose or gain by leaving our own culture? And what sacrifices does love demand of fathers and daughters, lovers and friends? Everything That Never Happened is a play about disguise, assimilation, pomegranates, and everything Shakespeare left out. Written by Sarah B. Mantell, and directed by Jessica Kubzansky, it runs September 27 through November 4 at the Boston Court in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-683-6801 or visit www.BostonCourtPasadena.org.

“Have Several Seats (A Musical Comedy Show)” Carlie Craig performs original comedic songs, celebrity impressions, and musical parodies all woven together with her side-splitting stand-up. The show highlights the highs and lows of her first five years in Los Angeles — between working as a personal assistant, starring on a short-lived reboot of an iconic sketch show, all while supporting herself as a party princess, Carlie has endless stories to tell and you won’t want to miss a single one. Written and directed by Carlie Craig, with music by Carlie Craig and Will Jay, it runs September 27 through September 30 at the Colony Theatre in Burbank. For tickets call 866-811-4111 or visit www.colonytheatre.org.

“Six Characters in Search of a Play” Del Shores brings to life six one-of-a-kind characters he has met in real life that haven’t quite made it into one of his plays, films or TV shows. In 90 minutes, the audience will hear the truth behind how he collected these eccentrics and their stories as he portrays his hilarious, off-the-rails encounters with them. The audience will meet “Yvonne”, the anti-vegetarian Dallas waitress; “Sarah”, a Trump-hating elderly actress with an inhaler in one hand and a cigarette in the other; “Jimmy Ray”, the evolving, Magic Mike-loving latent Georgia redneck; “Loraine”, the once-brilliant drama teacher who has lost her damn mind and is now obsessed with porn; “Marsha”, the monkey-hating lesbian with COPD; and “Aunt Bobby Sue”, the racist Republican with a heart of gold. Written by Del Shores, and directed by Emerson Collins, it runs September 27 through September 30 at the Celebration Theatre @ the Lex Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-957-1884 or visit www.celebrationtheatre.com.

“What Happened When” On a snowy night in a rural farmhouse, three siblings (Ian Bamberg, Matthew Gallenstein and, at alternate performances, Kenzie Caplan and Mara Klein) huddle together in the dark with a flashlight, while the audience (unseen by them) gathers closely around. Expect to be fully immersed in this beautiful, provocative and disturbing memory play. Written by Daniel Talbott, and directed by Chris Fields, it runs September 27 through October 18 at the Echo Theater Company Atwater Village Theatre in Atwater. For tickets call 310-307-3753 or visit www.EchoTheaterCompany.com.

“A Flock of Macaws” A young woman, abandoned at birth, finds the woman she believes to be her birth mother– What should be a reunion/reconciliation of sorts, turns into a combination of mutual interrogation, the absurdity of potential paternal candidates, with back stories straight out of an urban modern day, “Alice in Wonderland. Abandonment is the theme, but the ranting’s and ravings regarding everything from pop culture to politics, takes this moment and delivers a roller coaster ride, filled with everything from rage to contrition. Along the way, we meet an array of bizarre paternal candidates, as well as a young Actress, who stumbles into this world, eager to fill any void or role necessary. Written by Sam Henry Kass, and directed by Ronnie Marmo, it runs September 28 through October 20 at the Theatre 68 in North Hollywood. For tickets visit www.Theatre68.com.

“Showpony” When the mostly white employees from a large Ad Agency reveal their unconscious racism through slips of the tongue and gender micro-aggressions, the tensions build as aggressions move into overt racism and misogyny. Both African American and white women fight back. Hidden agendas, alliances and liaisons rise to the surface—in both fierce and fiercely funny ways. Written by Judith Leora, and directed by Tom Ormeny, it runs September 28 through November 18 at the Big Victory Theatre in Burbank. For tickets call 818-841-5421 or visit www.thevictorytheatrecenter.org.

“The Turn of the Screw” The details: a letter, a locket, a riddle, a name. The words are her own — written in her diary in faded ink on the pages of seven days. This is the story she tells. It is a story of terror … and horror … and death.is the tale of a young governess just before the turn of the last century who is tasked with the care of two rather peculiar children at a country estate in England. The governess comes to believe the children are possessed by the previous groundskeeper and governess who have since died. Written by Henry James, adapted by Jeffrey Hatcher, and directed by Don K. Williams, it runs September 29 through October 31 at the Harold Clurman Laboratory Theatre at the Art of Acting Studio in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-601-5310 or visit www.web.ovationtix.com/trs/pr/999287.

 

Enjoy life more – see a show tonight!

“Scene in LA” August 2018 by Steve Zall and Sid Fish

Here are some of the shows you can see in our local theaters this month:

“Outlaw” During his years with the Hells Angels, Christie survived prison, multiple investigations, prosecutions and assassination attempts. Through it all, he considered himself to be a peacemaker in the outlaw biker community. With a reputation firmly established in popular culture, the Hells Angels have developed a modern mythology around themselves that presents as many questions about the group as answers. Are the Hells Angels organized criminals or compassionate givers to charity and the community? What really goes on behind closed club meeting doors? Written and directed by Richard La Plante, it runs August 2 through August 24 at the Whitefire Theatre in Sherman Oaks. For tickets call 213-713-9149 or visit www.Clagoproductions.com.

 

“Mamma Mia!” unfolds on a Greek island paradise when on the eve of her wedding, a young woman’s quest to discover the identity of her father brings three men from her mother’s past back to the island they last visited twenty years ago. Non-stop laughs and explosive dance numbers, along with the magic of ABBA’s hit songs that include “Super Trouper,” “Dancing Queen,” “Knowing Me, Knowing You,” “Take a Chance on Me,” “Thank You for the Music,” “Money, Money, Money,” “The Winner Takes It All,” and “SOS,” combine to make this enchanting show a trip down the aisle you’ll never forget! Written by Catherine Johnson, with music by Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus, and directed by David F.M. Vaughn, it runs August 3 through August 12 at the Redondo Beach Performing Arts Center in Redondo Beach, then August 17 through August 26 at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts in Cerritos. For tickets in Redondo Beach call 714-589-2770 Ext. 1, for tickets in Cerritos call 562-916-8500, or visit www.3dtheatricals.org for either venue.

“Shining City” is set in Dublin, where a guilt-ridden man reaches out to a therapist after the death of his wife in a car crash. Wrestling with his own demons, the therapist can only do so much to help. Routine visits between the two men quickly become a gripping struggle to survive, changing both of them for the rest of their lives. Written by Conor McPherson, and directed by Brian Foyster and Eddie Kehler, it runs August 3 through August 26 at the Hudson Guild Theatre in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-960-7780 or visit www.plays411.com/shiningcity.

“Titus Andronicus” Titus, a Roman general, returns from the war in triumph with Tamora, Queen of the Goths, as prisoner. What follows is a visceral story of temptation, political machinations, and the thirst for vengeance. It’s full of bloody spectacle, dark humor, and definitely not for the youngest audience members. Written by William Shakespeare, and directed by Melissa Chalsma, it runs August 4 through September 2 at the Old Zoo in Griffith Park in Los Angeles. For tickets call 818-710-6306 or visit www.iscla.org.

“Yellow Face” is based on the author’s own life. When Hwang mistakenly makes a disastrous casting decision, he quickly gets in over his head. As the situation spirals further out of control, he finds himself at the center of a government intrigue and investigation. Written by David Henry Hwang, and directed by Rob Zimmerman, it runs August 10 through September 26 at the Beverly Hills Playhouse in Beverly Hills. For tickets visit www.plays411.com/yellowface.

“End of the Rainbow” It’s December 1968 and Judy Garland is about to make her comeback….again. In a London hotel room, with both her new young fiancé and her adoring accompanist, Garland struggles to get “beyond the rainbow” with her signature cocktail of talent, tenacity and razor-sharp wit. Featuring some of Garland’s most memorable songs, “You Made Me Love You (I Didn’t Want To Do it),” “For Me And My Gal,” “The Trolley Song,” ”The Man That Got Away,” and, of course, “Over the Rainbow,” this savagely funny play offers a unique insight into the inner conflict that inspired and consumed one of America’s most beloved figures. Written by Peter Quilter, and directed by Michael Matthews, it runs August 12 through September 2 at the Laguna Playhouse in Laguna Beach. For tickets call 949-497-2787 or visit www.lagunaplayhouse.com.

“Man of La Mancha” The fictionalized author ‘Cervantes’ is the main character of Man of La Mancha. While in prison during the Spanish Inquisitions, he is forced to act out parts of Don Quixote for the other inmates. This story-within-a-story of Don Quixote’s musical misadventures – rife with love, chivalry, and of course, four-armed giants – unfurls into something more transcendent: a beacon of hope in a dire world. One of the most important hits of Broadway’s golden age, audiences have been dreaming “The Impossible Dream” for the past half century with the wandering hidalgo in this quintessential tale about the resilience of the human spirit, and the power of storytelling when faced with insurmountable odds. Written by Dale Wasserman, with music by Mitch Leigh, lyrics by Joe Darion, and directed by Julia Rodriguez-Elliott, it runs August 16 through September 9 at the A Noise Within in Pasadena. For tickets call 626-356-3121 or visit www.anoisewithin.org.

“Pizza Man” CONSUMER ADVISORY: Includes material related to sex and sexual violence. Leave the kids at home. Alice and Julie are frustrated 20somethings, sharing an apartment in Los Angeles. They’re frustrated personally, professionally and sexually. Julie does not seem able to hold either a job or a man for an extended length of time. Alice has been in a dead-end relationship with a married man who she cannot seem to live without. Both women, tired of being harassed by men in every way, decide to hatch a scheme intended to reverse their power dynamic. Julie decides to drink herself into oblivion whilst Alice turns to food to squash her emotions. With too much alcohol and an empty fridge, they decide to order a delivery and find a man to fulfill their needs. When the “Pizza Man” arrives at their door, it seems their prayers were answered…. Or at least, that’s what they thought. What lies ahead, none of them ever could have imagined. Written by Darlene Craviotto, and directed by Natalie Sutherland, it runs August 16 through August 26 at the Dorie Theatre at the Complex in Hollywood. For tickets visit www.pizzamancomplex.com.

“I Am Sophie” Have you ever wondered what it might be like to re-invent yourself – to start over as someone else? Sophie gives you a chance to sit court-side during one such adventure. To join her on an existential, down the rabbit hole, adventure of self-discovery. This piece aims to wake up your sleeping soul and remind you to go out and live life in whatever way feels best to you – others opinions be damned. That said, Sophie will soar to the highest heights and plummet to the lowest lows. But what journey of self-discovery doesn’t have that? Beauty and pain so often occur at the same exact time, don’t they? Written by Corinne Shor, and directed by Susan Angelo, it runs August 17 through September 2 at the Pico in Los Angeles. For tickets visit www.iamsophie.brownpapertickets.com.

“Paradise” When a southern coal mining town goes from boom to bust, a charismatic preacher arrives to offer salvation…along with his bombshell sidekick who was rescued from a stripper pole. But, now there’s a network reality TV producer from Hollywood who has different ideas about how to make the town great again. Written by Cliff Wagner, Bill Robertson & Tom Page, with music by Cliff Wagner, lyrics by Bill Robertson & Tom Page, and directed by Michael Myers, it runs August 17 through September 23 at the Ruskin Group Theatre in Santa Monica. For tickets call 310-397-3244 or visit www.ruskingrouptheatre.com.

 

“Jews, Christians and Screwing Stalin” On the eve of Rosh Hashanah in 1967, Joey brings his pregnant, Christian fiancé home to meet the radical communist bubby who raised him. Minka Grazonsky is tough as nails — and why not? Her brother was the first president of Stalin’s Soviet Union. When Joey’s alcoholic father shows up at the table, alliances are challenged and new beginnings forged… maybe. Written by Mark Lonow and Jo Anne Astrow, and directed by Mark Lonow, it runs August 18 through September 23 at the Matrix Theatre in Los Angeles. For tickets call 323-960-4412 or visit www.Plays411.com/Matzoballs.

“LYMAN, The Musical” follows a woman who meets a homeless man she thinks she recognizes. She ponders whether his homelessness was a cause of life choices or destiny, and she takes us on a journey through the various universes in which Lyman would have existed but for chance. With original songs performed by the cast, the show helps us learn the truth about how choices affect destiny and what it means to be a hero. Written and directed by Anne Johnstonbrown, with music by Anne Johnstonbrown, it runs August 18 through August 26 at the El Portal Theatre in North Hollywood. For tickets call 818-508-4200 or visit www.lymanthemusical.com.

“Marian, or the True Tale of Robin Hood” is a gender-bending, patriarchy-smashing, hilarious new take on the classic Robin Hood myth. In Szymkowicz’s retelling of the tale, Robin Hood is (and has always been) Maid Marian in disguise, and leads a motley group of Merry Men (a few of whom are actually men) against the greedy Prince John. As the poor get poorer and the rich get richer, who will stand for the vulnerable if not Robin? What is the cost of revealing your true self in a time of trouble? Modern concerns and romantic entanglements clash on the battlefield and on the ramparts of Nottingham Castle. A play about selfishness and selflessness and love deferred and the fight. Always the fight. The fight must go on. Written by Adam Szymkowicz, and directed by Christopher Johnson, it runs August 23 through September 22 at the Theatre of NOTE in Hollywood. For tickets call 323-856-8611 or visit www.theatreofnote.com.

 

“The Glass Menagerie” this autobiographical “memory play” captures the fragility and stifled yearning of characters clinging to hope against the harsh realities of a rapidly changing world. Confined to a tiny St. Louis apartment on the eve of World War II, the Wingfield family struggles to find beauty amid the rough circumstances that surround them. Written by Tennessee Williams, and directed by John Henry Davis, it runs August 24 through September 9 at the International City Theatre Long Beach Performing Arts Center in Long Beach. For tickets call 562-436-4610 or visit www.InternationalCityTheatre.org.

“Hole in the Sky” is a California story about how we live with fire, water, and family. A young woman returns home to find her family and community in a bitter fight over who owns the local groundwater during a devastating California drought. Caught between loyalty to her family’s ranch and fear – of wildfire, of loss of identity and culture, Connor finds her small town trying to figure out how to live with nature when nature doesn’t seem to want us there: “We’d get along with the environment a whole lot better if we didn’t have to live in it”. Written by Octavio Solis, and directed by Kate Jopson, it runs August 24 through September 23 at the Courtship Ranch in Lake View Terrace. For tickets visit www.circlextheatre.org.

“The Man Who Saved Everything” Before his life as an adult could begin, Barry left school and moved back home to care for his aging parents. When they died, he never left — literally. Barry became obsessed with holding onto every single possession and treasured item that might help keep alive the memory of his parents and his prior life. He saved everything. Decades later, Barry lives inside a massive hoard of possessions. But his neighborhood is being redeveloped and he faces eviction. Only his niece and a former friend from college care enough for his health and well-being to attempt to convince him to leave his longtime home. How can Barry abandon a collection that he has carefully curated and guarded for decades, a hoard of items that has literally become his home? What happens to his memories when the possessions that anchored them are gone? Written by Benjamin Scuglia, and directed by Michael Van Duzer, it runs August 24 through September 23 at the Theatre West in Studio City. For tickets visit www.theatrewest.org.

“BARK! The Musical” is a tuneful tribute to dogs and their intrepidly human hearts. Written by Mark Winkler and Gavin Geoffrey Dillard, with music by David Troy Francis, and directed by Susan Stangl, it runs August 31 through October 7 at the Theatre Palisades in Pacific Palisades. For tickets call 310-454-1970 or visit www.theatrepalisades.com.

 

Enjoy life more – see a show tonight!